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Vuitton’s new “Dissonance” line



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It seems that we’ve all been had in a bit of fun, involving a good old campaign of commercial build-up.  Who doesn’t remember the enigmatic advertising blitz for “Gabbo” in The Simpsons’ “Krusty gets Kancelled” episode?

 

Well, “the day has finally arrived at which Gabbo’s identity will be revealed” or, in this case, the line of luxury products that apparently were, all along, the point of the global warming hype, are rolled out.

 

The January ’08 issue of Vanity Fair has three Louis Vuitton ads inside the front cover, featuring Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf, Gorbachev, and Catherine Deneuve. A small caption in each ad notes that Graf, Agassi, and Deneuve (along with Vuitton, of course) support Gore’s Climate Project while Gorbachev (and Vuitton) support the Green Cross.

 

The ads’ common thread is rampant luxury consumerism joined with luxurious consumption of energy.  In the Agassi-Graf ad, they’ve just landed after having flown who knows how far.

 

Who would begrudge them, having just played the doubles match of all our lives, taking climate change to extra sets!?  Their laptop computer hums in the background, doubtless powered by the morning sun breaking through the drape, and behold all manner of luxury travel paraphernalia lying about including the camera, slyly teasing possibly a slide show depicting the horrors of St. Tropez, a climatic fate that could befall Minnesota if we’re not careful.

 

Gorbachev rakishly directs his driver (just imagine if he’d won the Cold War!), James, once around The Wall, then off to give a speech about the immorality of individual energy use!  To each according to his needs, and all that.. 

 

 

The ageless Deneuve adorns a steam train, if only of the movie-set variety, so as to simply romanticizie the idea of burning coal and wood.

 

Where might this mysterious woman be going to deliver Gore’s Power Point?  Somewhere on the Orient Express no doubt (though most of the stops along the way are in countries exempt from Kyoto). Possibly the message is that the millions of people who go to see her movies will travel the several miles to and from the theater by train, instead of car?  Who can care of such things when decked out in such finery as she, perched atop numerous Vutton suitcases, stuffed, no doubt, to the hinges with pamphlets? 

 

In short, each ad glorifies and promotes a luxury lifestyle that requires several times the CO2 emissions of even the average, supposedly gluttonous American. Yet somehow, apparently, such high falootin’ consumerism fights climate change.

 

Hat tip to by PG colleague Joel Schwartz for passing these along.



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