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Midwest Cancun Delegation Returns to Deep Freeze



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Has there ever been a better illustration of the gulf between America’s political elites and Middle America?

This weekend, a delegation to the United Nation’s Climate Summit in the Mexican resort city of Cancun — one that included Midwest college students and faculty alongside Washington negotiators — returned to declare that they had come to an agreement to transfer $100 billion to Third World countries to combat catastrophic global warming. The announcement came as a brutal winter snowstorm buried the Midwest in record snowdrifts that collapsed the Minneapolis Metrodome and killed five people in the Metro Detroit area.

Despite last year’s Climategate scandal that has gutted climate-science credibility, the United States increased funding three-fold in 2010 to a staggering $1.7 billion-a-year to fight the phantom global warming menace at a time when the country’s federal and state budgets are hobbled by a loss of revenue from the Great Recession.

Local Michigan governments like Oakland County have cut its snow and salt crews by one-third to meet budget — crews that were sorely missing Monday morning as semi-trucks jackknifed on slick roads, clotting roadways and forcing backups for miles.

Maybe those college students would have learned more in a Detroit warming center where large numbers of homeless are expected this year in the midst of a down Detroit economy.

It is hard to square the rhetoric of sunny Cancun with the reality of Detroit’s cold streets. U-M might expose its students to climatologist Pat Michaels who explains that even Cancun’s goal of an 80 percent carbon reduction by 2050 would have minimal effect on global temperatures. Or that diverting $100 million from economic engines like the U.S. to create green utopias will increase global poverty.

Read more at The Michigan View here.



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