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Sure, It’s Cold in Europe -- But Who Could’ve Predicted It?



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Aside from the Poles and Russians, I mean. From October:

CLEVELAND – If you are planning a trip to Europe this winter, better pack the winter woolies. Several scientists there say this winter could be the coldest Europe has seen in the last 1,000 years.

Why this dire prediction? Polish scientists say the coming cold is connected to the speed of the Gulf Stream. That’s the warm current of water that travels from the Tropical Atlantic up along the US East Coast and over to Europe. the Gulf Stream effectively brings warmer temperatures to Europe, especially during the cold season. Figure 1 photo shows an active Gulf stream back in 2009. Note the active streams of warmer water (reds and yellow streaks) moving northeast thru the Atlantic Ocean. Figure 2 shows the active warm water streams as of September 1st, 2010. they are substantially weaker!

The Gulf Stream has really slowed down in the past two years. Its now moving at just half the speed it was just a couple of years ago. The scientists believe that this means the stream will not be able to add that extra heat to the European Countryside and compensate for the cold, Arctic winds. These scientists also believe, when the Gulf Stream stops completely, a new Ice Age will begin in Europe…

In Russia, scientists are not as convinced, but are still predicting colder than normal winter temperatures:

“Although the forecast for the next month is only 70 percent accurate, I find the cold winter scenario quite likely,” said Russian Meteorologist Vadim Zavodchenkov, “We will be able to judge with more certainty come November. As for last summer’s heat, the statistical models that meteorologists use to draw up long-term forecasts aren’t able to predict an anomaly like that.” Thanks to Russian TImes/RT.

Also from October, there’s this prediction from the alarmist-friendly Met Office in the UK:

Met Office data suggests mild winter but don’t forget last year

Its “Barbecue Summer” was a washout while its “mild winter” was the coldest for 31 years, so you might be forgiven for taking the Met Office’s latest prediction with a pinch of salt.

But the official forecasters have said that this winter could be unusually mild and dry, with temperatures at least 2C more than last year’s big freeze in which snow and ice caused travel chaos across much of Britain.

Although the Met Office no longer issues long-term forecasts, their latest data suggest a high probability of a warmer winter for London, the East of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Methinks the Met Office should stop issuing forecasts of any type.



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