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Hype and Fear Do Not Justify Power Grabs



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 CFACT Blog from Doha — Day 2

It must be understood that what is occurring here, not just in Doha but in the whole climate change process, is a complete transformation of the economic structure of the world.  It should happen much quicker than it is happening, but it cannot happen overnight. – UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres

Kicking off the second week of climate negotiations in Doha, Qatar, Ms. Figueres outlined the process her climate confab is preparing to undertake, to push through a second commitment period of greenhouse gas reductions after the Kyoto Protocol expires at the end of the year. Step one is putting in place the “necessary amendments” to the current Kyoto Protocol and extending its life with another round of commitments. Step two is working toward “a new universal agreement that is legally based” and can be fully up and running by 2020.

Achieving this, of course, will take a lot of strong-arming — which won’t be easy, even for a self-described “daughter of a revolutionary” like Figueres.

Canada has withdrawn from the process altogether. The US (at the moment anyway) remains insistent on developing world participation. Many expect Japan to say sayonara shortly. And then there’s China, which has always been an unwieldy participant, complicating negotiations.

CFACT, naturally, is doing its part to make Ms. Figueres’s job tougher. This week it plans to hold a press conference, challenging the need for a new treaty by pointing out there has been no statistically significant warming in the last 16 years. Marc Morano, editor of CFACT’s Climate Depot news and information service, will be releasing a report debunking claims of increasing severe weather incidents, and Lord Christopher Monckton will be on hand to greet reporters and conduct interviews with various media outlets that are covering COP 18.

Today, people enjoying the sun on the beaches near Doha were amused as CFACT staff paraded several camels sporting signs that read “Stop Climate Hype.” Tomorrow the organization will host conference participants on board a native Doah boat, introducing them to information that is critical of IPCC science. CFACT strongly believes that any “complete transformation of the economic structure of the world” should be base on real science — not on hypotheses, assertions, hype, and computer models that thus far have failed every attempt to verify their claims with actual observations and data on temperature, weather, and climate. 

Though she is certainly invited, it is doubtful Ms. Figueres will care to join them. 



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