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Global-Warming-Induced-Blizzard Contingency Plan in Place for Super Bowl XLVIII



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I think this plan is a little too optimistic. If the game is delayed for a week, what do the people do who not only bought plane tickets, but had hotel rooms reserved? It will be chaos. CBS Sports:

The NFL did a Super Bowl XLVIII presentation in New York on Wednesday in preparation for the big game coming in — somehow — just 46 days. By far the biggest concern with the 2014 Super Bowl, being played at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, is the weather.

Gary Meyers of the New York Daily News dropped a bit of a bombshell relating to crazy weather on Twitter, too, reporting that if a “crippling snowstorm” comes into play, the NFL could move the Super Bowl date.

[. . .]

So that’s sort of terrifying, right? At least from a logistical standpoint. But it seems fairly unlikely: it would have to be a MASSIVE snowstorm to keep the Super Bowl from being played on the biggest stage. Teams have prepared for weeks (and played for months) and fans have spent thousands to get to New York and see their team play.

And buddy if you think media members can complain about free food not being up to standard, wait’ll you see what happens if they have to stick around the city for an extra week. Or even a day.

NFL senior vice president of events Frank Sipovitz said he actually would welcome snow

“It would be kind of fun to watch a Super Bowl in the snow,” he said. “I think watching NFL football in the snow is really romantic and it’s great and it’s exciting, and if you’ve ever done it, you know that. It’s also a rite of passage for you as a fan to have done it at least once, and this is a Super Bowl. So this is going to be amazing. I think it would be better if it snowed a little bit during the game. I think it’ll just make it that much more memorable. Let it snow.”

Be careful what you wish for, Frank.

The rest here.

 


Tags: NFL


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