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Cool, New Footage of the Babe Surfaces



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Tom Shieber of Baseball Researcher posts some silent video of Babe Ruth from the 1925 season that the University of South Carolina, made public a few months back.

According to the university library’s Moving Image Research Collections:

MIRC began in 1980 with the gift of the Fox Movietone News Collection . . .  [which] comprises more than 2000 hours of edited stories, complete newsreels, and associated outtakes from the silent Fox News and sound Fox Movietone News Library. This unique film material dates from 1919–1934 and from 1942–1944.

Shieber comments:

When you think about it, this collection of footage is doubly rare. Certainly, very few people have seen the film today. But, since this footage didn’t make the cut for the original Movietone News reels shot in the 1920s and ’30s, it is likely that few beyond a handful of editors actually saw this footage back in the day.

He found one piece of video particularly fascinating, but not for the reason why it was supposedly shot:

One key to dating early baseball footage is to ask oneself, “For what reason did the news service want to cover what we’re seeing?” Unlike the situation today, where it seems that everyone and everything is captured on video all the time, in these earlier days, a conscious decision was made before sending a cameraman and equipment out on assignment. But what was so special about this June 1, 1925, game that footage would be wanted? Why cover this contest?

For the answer, we need to look back to early March of that year. As was often the case throughout his career, Ruth fell ill during spring training. However, this time his sickness was much worse than usual. The Babe was hospitalized and ultimately required surgery. Rumor had it that the Babe had serious digestive problems, brought upon by overeating, but this was a charge that Ruth himself denied. Nevertheless, sportswriters quickly dubbed the illness “The Bellyache Heard ‘Round the World.” The result was that the Yankees lost their star (and biggest drawing card) for the first month and a half of the season. Given that Ruth was the most dominant player of his day, most anything Ruthian was worth capturing on film. But it was simply a “no brainer” to send a cameraman over to Yankee Stadium in the spring of 1925 to cover Ruth’s first game back after a long, serious illness.

Footage of Babe Ruth’s first game back in 1925 is interesting, but perhaps not worth blogging about. However, it was not this portion of the film that excited me. Instead, it was other footage, shot earlier that same day, that caught my attention. This pre-game footage showed Ruth taking batting practice, tossing the ball around and posing for the camera in front of the Yankees dugout. Here’s are a pair of frames from this section of footage:





Behind Ruth, at far left, is a familiar Yankees player: Lou Gehrig. The previous season, Lou had a breakout year with Hartford of the Eastern League, batting.369 with 37 homers in 134 games. But at the moment we see Lou on the bench behind Ruth, Gehrig had played just 11 games with the 1925 Yankees, posting a meager .174 average while seeing intermittent action as an outfielder and pinch-hitter.

That afternoon, just two innings after the Ruth ground out captured on film, Gehrig was sent to pinch-hit for shortstop Pee Wee Wanninger. Lou flied out to Goose Goslin in left field.  But more importantly, it was the first game in which he had participated in four days. The next day, Gehrig started at first base, went 3-for-5 at the plate, and didn’t take another day off until May 2, 1939.

In short, not only does the footage capture Ruth’s return to the Yanks in 1925, but it also gives us a glimpse of Lou Gehrig on the very day he began his famous streak of 2,130 straight games played, a mark that remained unbroken for well over half a century. In hindsight, some very fortunate footage shot by a very lucky Fox Movietone cameraman.

Just . . . wow.

H/T Repoz at Baseball Think Factory
 


Tags: MLB


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