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Brief chronicles of our sporting times.

Luke Russert: A Racist Who Beat His Girlfriend Should Buy the Clippers



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NBC’s Luke Russert on who he thinks should buy the Clippers:

This is the same Mayweather that went on a racist, public tirade against Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao:

Mayweather said he planned to take about a year off — timed perfectly with a fight against Pacquiao next May — and that he would return to face his rival in a showdown for pound-for-pound supremacy.

The style will be remembered far more than the substance, though.

Mayweather said he would return to “cook that little yellow chump,” Pacquiao.

After “I stomp the midget,” Mayweather said he would “make me a sushi roll and cook me some rice.”

Mayweather said he “don’t have the urge to get up” and fight again.

“But when I do got the urge to get up, believe me my UStream and my Twitter fans will be the first to know, and when we do come back, we will kick (Pacquiao’s) (expletive).”

Mayweather repeatedly pronounced Pacquiao’s name as “Poochiao” during the course of the video, which lasted about 10 minutes.

And this is the same Mayweather who went to jail for beating up his girlfriend.

Boxing champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. is a perfect 42-0 in the ring and has dodged significant jail time several times in domestic violence cases in Las Vegas and Michigan.

But his courtroom streak came to an end Wednesday when a Las Vegas judge sentenced him to 90 days in jail after he pleaded guilty to a reduced battery domestic violence charge and no contest to two harassment charges.

The case stemmed from a hair-pulling, punching and arm-twisting argument with his ex-girlfriend Josie Harris while two of their children watched in September 2010.

“Punishment is appropriate,” Justice of the Peace Melissa Saragosa said after a prosecutor complained that Mayweather has been in trouble before and hasn’t faced serious consequences.

“No matter who you are, you have consequences to your actions when they escalate to this level of violence,” she said.

I look forward to Luke’s explanation. 

Tags: NBA

Donald Sterling and His Enablers at the NAACP



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One thing that stands out in the Donald Sterling story is his relationship with the NAACP. How did somebody so allegedly racist earn three NAACP awards? Well, two — a President’s award in 2008 and a Lifetime Achievement award in 2009. The NAACP, in light of recent events, has rescinded his second Lifetime Achievement award. But, still. Until this audio recording surfaced, the NAACP was honoring Sterling for two lifetimes’ worth of achievements. 

The NAACP was well aware of the controversy surrounding Sterling in 2009, but brushed it off. The Los Angeles Times, however, noticed the contradiction. From May 2009:

Something’s out of whack. . . .

Clippers owner Donald Sterling, accused of racism and embracing a “vision of a Southern plantation-type structure” in a lawsuit filed in February by Elgin Baylor, will be given a lifetime achievement award next week by the NAACP. . . .

Leon Jenkins, president of the Los Angeles branch of the civil rights organization, says of the much-maligned Sterling, “He has a unique history of giving to the children of L.A.,” revealing that the owner donates anywhere from 2,000 to 3,000 tickets a game to youth groups for nearly every Clippers home game. . . .

Noting that the NAACP had made plans to honor Sterling before Baylor filed suit, Jenkins says, “We can’t speak to the allegations, but what we do know is that for the most part [Sterling] has been very, very kind to the minority youth community.” . . .

Baylor didn’t mention that. . . .

And a few weeks later, ESPN The Magazine wrote a big piece on Sterling and his legal problems and was on hand at the NAACP award ceremony. ESPN’s reporting raises the obvious question, “what the hell was the NAACP thinking?” Here’s the opener:

For more than two years, Sterling has been staring down federal civil rights charges related to his real estate holdings and rental practices. According to the Justice Department, Sterling, his wife and three of his companies have engaged in discrimination, principally by refusing to rent to African-Americans. In February, Elgin Baylor, the Clippers GM from 1986 to 2008, filed an age and racial discrimination suit against his old boss alleging, among other things, that Sterling repeatedly expressed a desire to field a team of “poor black boys from the South … playing for a white coach.” Sterling’s attorneys have denied the accusations. And even as these controversies swirl around him, Sterling is here tonight to receive a lifetime achievement award from the local chapter of the NAACP.

The man of the hour ushers two black guests over to talk to the reporter.

“Donald Sterling is a prince among men,” says Leon Isaac Kennedy, who starred in the Penitentiary series of movies in the ’70s and ’80s. “I’ve been his friend for 25 years.” At dinner, the emcee updates the crowd on the Lakers, who are losing to Houston in a crucial playoff game. With Sterling in attendance, guests aren’t sure whether to boo or cheer. But when the Clippers owner rises to speak, he is gracious. “I really have a special feeling for this organization,” he says. He’s a major donor, contributing $10,000 to $15,000 this year alone, according to chapter president Leon Jenkins.

Sterling doesn’t stay to hear all the speakers — his entourage is at the hotel bar watching the game — but while speaking, he holds his two-handled trophy cup aloft. And he smiles that smile, the almost smirk you see in photo after photo of the man associates call The Donald. It’s smooth and self-satisfied and says not just that the guy behind it makes his own rules but that he’s won yet another round. Tell him he can’t move his team, and he’ll move it anyway. Complain that he’s a cheapskate, and he’ll spend just enough to maintain the profit margin he wants. Sue him for sexual harassment or housing discrimination, and he’ll buy your silence with a hefty cash settlement. Call him a racist, and he’ll show you an eminent civil rights organization lauding his accomplishments.

Fast forward to 2014, and the NAACP, based on everything that’s in the public record, decided to honor him again? I hope they, at the very least, insisted he stay for the entire award ceremony this time. 

But it’s not just the NAACP that held their tongue on Sterling. NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, in a much cited piece for Time, is “outraged” that people didn’t speak out sooner:

Make no mistake: Donald Sterling is the villain of this story. But he’s just a handmaiden to the bigger evil. In our quest for social justice, we shouldn’t lose sight that racism is the true enemy. He’s just another jerk with more money than brains.

So, if we’re all going to be outraged, let’s be outraged that we weren’t more outraged when his racism was first evident. 

Abdul-Jabbar is not the only one outraged. The perpetually outraged Al Sharpton had this to say:

According to the Reverend Al Sharpton, if the NBA does not come forward with a decision, he will begin calling on advertisers to withdraw starting tomorrow. On Meet the Press today Rev. Sharpton shared:

“Well, I think that clearly the National Basketball Association must suspend him,” said Reverend Sharpton. “Or must say that, ‘We’re going to remove any kind of imprimatur we have on this team if he’s the owner.’ You cannot have someone own an NBA team in this country and have these kind of attitudes.”

Sharpton said this of Sterling: “You must remember, he settled multi-million dollar discrimination lawsuits in the past, so he has a background. So what we said in National Action Network is the NBA ought to move right away. Let’s not play games. They say they’re going to investigate.”

Sharpton is, of course, a giant hypocrite. He and Sterling were both receiving awards at the 2014 NAACP gala. If Sharpton was so angered by Sterling’s past legal troubles, he certainly never mentioned it nor did he boycott the NAACP over Sterling’s second honor.

Reverend Sharpton says we can’t “have someone own an NBA team in this country and have these kind of attitudes,” yet there’s no outrage that the NAACP honored a man –three times –with these kind of attitudes. 

The good news is the media is starting to cover this strange relationship between the NAACP and Sterling, and I don’t think the racial-grievance industry is going to like what gets reported. 

 

 

 

Tags: NBA

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NBA Bans Donald Sterling for Life, Fine of $2.5 Million



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Shaquille O’Neal Mocks a Fan on Instagram



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Shaquille O’Neal called Donald Sterling’s private comments “repugnant.” What word would Shaq use describe the mocking of the defenseless in public? I’d use, “ass,” but am open to other, stronger suggestions that can make it past the censors.

Via the New York Post:

Former NBA star Shaquille O’Neal is under fire for mocking a disabled fan’s selfie.

The retired athlete posted a picture on Instagram of his own contorted face next to Jahmel Binion’s selfie.

FOX 2 reports the post, captioned “Smile today,” earned more than 14,000 likes, with former University of Michigan athlete Trey Burke and rapper Waka Flocka Flame joining in on the teasing.

The post has been deleted. But for Binion, the damage has been done.

And here’s the picture:

I wonder what the Venn diagram looks like of the 14,000 people who “liked” the above photo and agreed with Shaq on Sterling’s comments? 

Tags: NBA

Hey, NYers: It’s Robbie Cano, Don’cha Know?



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Here’s the Mariners second baseman appearing in a hilarious Tonight Show skit filmed yesterday in Bryant Park:

Heck, it’s right up there with last year’s awesome Matt Harvey performance.

More here.

Tags: MLB

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And This Is Why You Don’t Bring Flares to a Soccer Game



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Ooof. It seems that the propellant in the cop’s pepper spray is flammable, leading to the result below when coming into contact with the hooligan’s lighted flare:

Deadspin has the video and notes that the photo was the result of lucky-timing as the actual fireball was quite brief and went out as soon as the officer stopped spraying.

Tags: Misc.

Reveille 4/28/14



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Good morning.

Here are several links from the past week that will make your Monday at the office a bit more bearable:

Carp also managed to face seven batters without allowing a single hit. That makes sense. You have to actually throw pitches where bats can get to them in order to give up hits:

Mike_carp_zone_plot

No strikeouts — and just 14 strikes in 38 attempts — with five walks allowed. Amazingly, Carp only gave up one run during all of this, on a bases-loaded walk that brought in Brett Gardner from third. It’s no wonder he couldn’t throw strikes when you consider he was relying on a knuckleball almost half of the time.

  • Bill Chuck of Gammons Daily highlights the Nationals’ left-on-base woes in their extra-inning loss to the Padres last Thursday, and then points out that, so far this year, eight of nine teams that stranded at least 15 runners on base in a game emerged victorious.
  • Unlike the Obamacare rollout, expanded replay has not been a catastrophe, but there have been a few bugs, particularly in the way the “transfer rule” was getting interpreted. Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports broke the news that MLB has set things straight:

A catch, forceout or tag will be considered legal if a fielder has control of the ball in his glove, but drops the ball after opening his glove to transfer the ball to his throwing hard, sources said. No longer will the fielder be required to successfully get the ball into his throwing hand.

That’s it. Have a walk-off week!

Tags: MLB

Does Sterling Have to Give Back His Other Two NAACP Awards?



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The NAACP just announced that it is rescinding Don Sterling’s 2014 “Lifetime Achievement” award.

However, Sterling won a NAACP Lifetime Achievement award in 2009 and a NAACP President’s Award in 2008. From his bio on the website of the Clippers:

He has received many honors, including the 2009 NAACP Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2008 BBA Humanitarian of the Year Award, the 2008 NAACP President’s Award, the 2006 Say Yes to Children Network ChildrenÂ’s Hero Award, the 1999 MDA Dennis Day Memorial Award, the 1998 Los Angeles Yeshiva Golden Menorah Humanitarian of the Year Award, the Asthma & Allergy Foundation 1998 Humanitarian of the Year Award, the Vista Del Mar Orphanage 1997 Man of the Year and the Gold Medal Humanitarian of the Year by the Special Olympics.

 

Tags: NBA

Donald Sterling Set to Receive NAACP Award



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I wonder if the Los Angeles chapter of the NAACP is having second thoughts on honoring Clippers’ owner Don Sterling with a “Lifetime Achievement” award? And what is Sterling’s photograph policy?

Tags: NBA

Northwestern Football Players Voting Today on Unionization



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But nobody will know how they voted. AP:

Northwestern football players cast secret ballots Friday in an on-campus hall adjacent to their home stadium on whether to form the nation’s first union for college athletes.

Just don’t expect results any time soon.

After the vote, the ballot boxes will be sealed for weeks or months — perhaps even years — as an appeal by the Evanston-based university runs its course.

The full National Labor Relations Board agreed Thursday to hear the school’s appeal of a regional director’s March ruling that the players are employees and as such can unionize, triggering a rule that the ballots be impounded.

Last month’s decision by the Chicago-area head of the NLRB, Peter Ohr, sent shockwaves through the world of college sports, prompting sharp criticism from Northwestern and college athletic departments nationwide.

The major outstanding issue, to me, is if the scholarship money would be taxed. As that’s an unknown, I’m not sure how valid this vote will be either way. 

Tags: NCAA

Meet a Red Sox Fan Who’s Not Boston Strong



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The embarrassingly overt display of pine tar dominated the Fenway Park postgame chatter on Wednesday evening, but there was another incident of note that took place during the Yankees–Red Sox game:

 

 

Via Mike Oz of Big League Stew:

We can debate very many things in baseball — whether Pete Rose belongs in the Hall of Fame, if WAR is a worthwhile stat, whether pine tar should be against the rules for pitchers — but here is one thing that we all should agree on: If a player at a baseball game tosses a ball to a kid, no adult should take it.

Never. Ever. Ever, ever, ever, ever.

Obviously the adult fan above at Thursday’s Boston Red Sox-New York Yankees game at Fenway Park didn’t get that memo. Because when Xander Bogaerts of the Red Sox tossed a ball to a young kid in the third inning, the “grown up” swooped in and snatched it. Booooooo!

This dude clearly wasn’t in a Boston Strong state of mind.

More here.

Tags: MLB

Piñeda Tar



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Michael Piñeda knew that he would be watched closely during last night’s start in Boston, considering that he had been questioned for allegedly using pine tar in his last outing against the Red Sox.

Nonetheless, after a rough first inning in which he allowed two runs, the pitcher walked out to the mound to pitch the second with a large smear of pine tar on the side of his neck.

Sox Skipper John Farrell seemed almost apologetic for having to say something to the home-plate umpire:

“You could see it. I could see it from the dugout. It was confirmed by a number of camera angles in the ballpark. And given the last time we faced him, I felt like it was a necessity to say something,” Farrell said after the Red Sox’s 5-1 win at Fenway Park. “I fully respect on a cold night you’re trying to get a little bit of a grip, but when it’s that obvious, something has got to be said.”

For violating Rule 8.02(a), Piñeda was ejected from the game and faces a ten-game suspension.

Meanwhile, David Schoenfield of ESPN SweetSpot raises questions about this type of cheating:

The trouble, of course, is even if all the players generally accept substances like pine tar and sunscreen as part of the unwritten rules of baseball: How should you legislate their usage? Right now, those are foreign substances and, by rule, are illegal. The Red Sox were certainly within their right to request a check on Pineda.

Are there levels of cheating? Steroids are evil bad stuff but pine tar is OK? But what about Whitey Ford’s mud or Don Sutton’s sandpaper? What if some pitchers can throw a better slider by applying a little extra pine tar on the right spot on the ball?

It’s certainly a slippery slope and as baseball wrestles with some of the issues involving instant replay or the new transfer rule, it has another can of worms (or cans of spray-on sunscreen) to deal with. If you’re all about enforcing the rules — whether it’s catching steroids users or defining a catch — do you start enforcing the use of foreign substances by pitchers?

More here and here.

Tags: MLB

Wrigley Field Turns 100 Today



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A joke that’s heard in Chicago goes like this: “What do the Cubs and Marlins have in common? Neither has won a World Series in their new ballpark.”

Marlins Park opened two years ago, while the first professional baseball game in Wrigley Field (née Weeghman Park) was played on this date in 1914.

Paul Sullivan of the Chicago Tribune offers up an interesting read on the North Side landmark, pointing out that the cathedral nearly hosted its first night game 46 years before the lights were finally turned on:

People think of Wrigley Field as a link to our past, and most view longtime owner Philip K. Wrigley as a traditionalist because of his resistance to installing lights.

But that’s not completely accurate. Wrigley was ready to begin playing night baseball in 1942, only to donate the lights, towers and cable to the government for the World War II effort the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed on Dec. 7, 1941.

The Cubs host the Diamondbacks at 1:20 p.m. CDT.

Tags: MLB

Pujols Strokes No. 499, Then No. 500



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Congratulations, King Albert:

The impressive milestone notwithstanding, I’m guessing that the 34-year-old Pujols is even happier to have rediscovered the stroke that made him a St. Louis legend for eleven seasons. He has eight home runs and five doubles in a mere 92 plate appearances this season, good for a .619 slugging percentage and .406 weighted on-base average.

The Halos won their second in a row at Nationals Park, 7–2.

Tags: MLB

The ‘Unwritten Rules’ Strike Again



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Last weekend was all about MLB’s “unwritten rules,” as the code that’s too amoprhous to put in writing reared its ugly head in Oakland on Friday, Washington on Saturday, and Pittsburgh on Sunday.

  • At O.Co Coliseum, a pitcher took exception to a bunt with his team down seven in the first inning. Words were exchanged between the pitcher and his skipper on one side and the batter on the other, leading to both benches’ emptying.
  • In Nationals Park, the home team’s young superstar didn’t run through the first-base bag on a comebacker, never mind that the out had already been recorded by the time he peeled off in the direction of the dugout. In response, the manager abruptly removed him from the game.
  • Over at PNC Park, a pitcher who has less than one year of service in the majors got peeved after a batter playing in his eighth big-league season hit a deep fly to center and then flipped his bat and started a slow trot toward first base. When the ball neither cleared the fence nor was caught, the batter turned on the jets and slid into third base with a triple. The pitcher and a bench-warming teammate ran over to the batter to jaw at him, and a brawl ensued.

The objection to Jed Lowrie’s bunt against the shift is downright silly. Even if you believe that a bunt or attempted steal in a blowout is bush-league, no professional team with an ounce of dignity — yes, that includes the bottom-feeding Astros and manager Bo Porter — has the right to cry “No más!” in the bottom of the first inning.

Bryce Harper is the face of his franchise and, if anything, he too often risks injury by playing the game with reckless abandon. On the play in question, he hit a one-hopper back to the mound. Although out by a country mile, he didn’t run through the bag – apparently a cardinal sin in Matt Williams’s unwritten rule book. Why that’s so important on a comebacker is beyond me. And even so, why make a mountain out of a molehill? Was yanking the 21-year-old from a close game ND then later blabbing to reporters about his decision the appropriate way to address the matter?

From batting Harper sixth on the second game of the season to whispering to the Washington Post’s Tom Boswell that he faked a quadricep injury so as not to face Marlins’ ace Jose Fernandez, the Nats seem more interested in feuding with their five-tool sensation than with the rival Braves. He won’t be a free agent until four more seasons, but the Nats act as though they can’t wait to see him playing the game in pinstripes.

Whatever you thought of last September’s Turner Field antics featuring Carlos Gomez, the behavior of the Brewers’ center fielder on slugging Gerrit Cole’s over-the-middle fastball was more mild than your typical deep-fly flip-and-pose. Moreover, Gomez’s slow trot toward first might have cost him a chance at an inside-the-park home run, which should have angered his own teammates, not Cole. Heck, the young pitcher and Travis Snider, the bench player, should have profusely thanked him for dogging it out of the box.

In each of these cases, the breaking of one of three of the game’s supposedly unwritten rules — don’t bunt when your team is way ahead, run through the first-base bag even though you’re out by 45 feet and/or not 100 percent healthy, and don’t admire a well-struck ball because it upsets the opposing pitcher — resulted in hurt feelings because they’re either ambiguous and/or plain stupid.

The solution?

I don’t know, perhaps players and managers alike may devote a little less energy on attitude adjustment and more on winning the darn game?

Tags: MLB

Reveille 4/21/14



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Good morning.

Here are several links from the past week that will make your Monday at the office a bit more bearable:

As good as they are, the A’s easily could ask: Why should we pigeonhole ourselves? Why should [Jim] Johnson or anyone else solely pitch the ninth? Most teams need multiple closers to get through a season, anyway. Heck, eight other clubs already have swapped out their original choice because of injury or ineffectiveness, and it’s only mid-April.

To be sure, devotees of Bill James would rejoice if the A’s abandoned the standard middle reliever/setup man/closer setup in favor of a less structured approach. Managers, though, generally prefer order in their bullpens. And relievers generally prefer defined roles. . . .

To be sure, a one-inning closer who pitches mostly in save situations is not conducive to an optimal bullpen. On the other hand, the creation of an entirely new usage pattern would require not just a strong manager, but also strong-minded relievers.

  • While ESPN Radio gabber Mike Greenberg kvetches that the strike zone is too small, Beyond the Boxscore’s Chris Moran shows that the K rate keeps rising.
  • Pay close attention, fans of the Diamondbacks and Brewers: Moran’s colleague, Scott Lindholm, investigates whether early-season records, really good (Milwaukee) and pretty awful (Arizona), are accurate barometers of how teams will perform the rest of the way.
  • Citing a plate appearance from a recent Astros–Blue Jays game, Blake Murphy of Fangraphs asks, “Why would a pitcher pitch against the shift?”

As mentioned, the Astros were probably smart to employ a shift and then pitch “out” of the shift by dealing away. Last year, [Jose] Bautista took 27 outside pitches to the opposite field while pulling 64 outside pitches. More importantly, he hit groundballs to the right side on just six occasions compared to 49 pulled groundballs.

In other words, even with an outside pitch that should theoretically be easier to take the other way, Bautista is pretty unlikely to hit a groundball to the right side, meaning the cost of shifting isn’t very high at all. Sometimes pull-push percentages can confuse the fact that teams don’t care about pull rates on the whole when shifting, they only care about where groundballs are hit (since, obviously, flyballs and even linedrives are less likely to land where shifted players are or are not).

 

 

  • David Schoenfield of ESPN’s SweetSpot discusses yesterday’s on-field brawl in Pittsburgh featuring the showy and combustible Carlos Gomez. (I hope to offer a few thoughts later today regarding three weekend incidents — the one in Oakland, the one in Washington, and the aforementioned one in Pittsburgh — involving the so-called unwritten rules.)

That’s it. Have a walk-off week!

Tags: MLB

Did the Secret Service Take Aim at Mr. Met?



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According to a new book by the young man who inhabited the Mr. Met costume from 1994 to 1997, it nearly came to that:

 

 

[A. J.] Mass was angling to get a picture with Clinton on April 15, 1997 — the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s historic first major league game.

Accompanied by two female college interns, the costumed Mass set off in search of his presidential prey: “The holy grail for all mascots — a photo op and meet and greet with a sitting President,” he wrote.

His hopes were soon crushed by the Secret Service agent sporting a dark suit and a darker mood.

Mass recalled the agent started eyeballing him after Mr. Met’s head failed to fit through an on-field metal detector.

Alas, the article doesn’t indicate whether the “two female college interns” were able to spend quality time with President Clinton.

More here.

Tags: MLB

Chris Resop Strikes a Pose



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Well, my first visit to the Cespedes Family Barbeque site was a memorable one.

While sitting down during lunch today, I clicked over to check out a recommended post from Jordan Shusterman entitled ”Chris Resop — The Most Interesting Reliever in the World”:

As some of you may know, I am quite fond of ridiculously lopsided batter-pitcher match-ups. The match-up that everyone’s been freaking out about lately is Paul Goldschmidt vs. Tim Lincecum, and rightfully so. It’s completely ridiculous. Anyway, I was recently checking out Starlin Castro’s most lopsided match-ups. Sure enough, there was Resop. Castro is 6-8 with three home runs, zero walks, zero strikeouts, and one hit-by-pitch against Mr. Resop. Interesting! Sorta. Using our buddy Daren Willman‘s amazing Media tab on Chris Resop’s player page over on baseballsavant.com, I went back and found video of the three dingers he gave up to Starlin.

To find out what Shusterman subsequently uncovered about Resop, you will need to visit his post.

H/T Baseball Think Factory.

Tags: MLB

The NYT vs. Florida State’s Jameis Winston



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The Times has a damning report out today on the handling of the rape case against Florida State’s star QB, Jameis Winston. In summary, “there was virtually no investigation at all, either by the police or the university.”

The opener:

Early on the morning of Dec. 7, 2012, a freshman at Florida State University reported that she had been raped by a stranger somewhere off campus after a night of drinking at a popular Tallahassee bar called Potbelly’s.

As she gave her account to the police, several bruises began to appear, indicating recent trauma. Tests would later find semen on her underwear.

For nearly a year, the events of that evening remained a well-kept secret until the woman’s allegations burst into the open, roiling the university and threatening a prized asset: Jameis Winston, one of the marquee names of college football.

Three weeks after Mr. Winston was publicly identified as the suspect, the storm had passed. The local prosecutor announced that he lacked the evidence to charge Mr. Winston with rape. The quarterback would go on to win the Heisman Trophy and lead Florida State to the national championship.

In his announcement, the prosecutor, William N. Meggs, acknowledged a number of shortcomings in the police investigation. In fact, an examination by The New York Times has found that there was virtually no investigation at all, either by the police or the university.

The police did not follow the obvious leads that would have quickly identified the suspect as well as witnesses, one of whom videotaped part of the sexual encounter. After the accuser identified Mr. Winston as her assailant, the police did not even attempt to interview him for nearly two weeks and never obtained his DNA.

The detective handling the case waited two months to write his first report and then prematurely suspended his inquiry without informing the accuser. By the time the prosecutor got the case, important evidence had disappeared, including the video of the sexual act.

“They just missed all the basic fundamental stuff that you are supposed to do,” Mr. Meggs said in a recent interview. Even so, he cautioned, a better investigation might have yielded the same result.

The case has unfolded as colleges and universities across the country are facing rising criticism over how they deal with sexual assault, as well as questions about whether athletes sometimes receive preferential treatment. The Times’s examination — based on police and university records, as well as interviews with people close to the case, including lawyers and sexual assault experts — found that, in the Winston case, Florida State did little to determine what had happened.

The rest here.

Welcome to Vandelay Industries Park



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Via the New York Daily News: The Mets’ single-A farm team on Coney Island wants its fans to be masters of their domain:

In a promotion straight out of Bizarro World, the Brooklyn Cyclones will celebrate “Salute to Seinfeld Night” in honor of the “show about nothing.”

Scheduled for July 5, the 25th anniversary of the show’s first airing, the event includes free Keith Hernandez “Magic Loogie” Bobblehead dolls to the first 2,500 fans who arrive at MCU Park — which will be called Vandelay Industries Park for the special occasion.

The Cyclones are also promising a free ticket to anybody who shows up with a business card proving they are a latex salesman, as long as the telephone number given isn’t for an apartment on the Upper East Side.

Unfortunately, there’s no truth to the rumor that the right-field foul pole will be replaced with the aluminum pipe Frank Costanza uses during Festivus.

More here.

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