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Tags: Reince Priebus

Priebus: ‘I Don’t Actually Think’ Hillary Will Run



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Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus suggested Sunday that Republicans welcome a Hillary Clinton presidential run, citing the former first lady and secretary of state’s poor record in government service and unimpressive work history.

“Given the month she just had, I actually doubt very much whether she actually will run for president in 2016,” Priebus told David Gregory on NBC’s Meet the Press. The RNC head was responding to questions about Clinton’s age and health, which he considered legitimate issues that have been raised about presidential candidates including Ronald Reagan, John McCain, and Bob Dole.

Priebus warmed to the topic, however, after Gregory quoted a reverse-humorous column by New York Times antidote-to-laughter Gail Collins, who accused “the Right” of blaming Clinton for a variety of problems.

“This writer you just quoted talks about sweeping things under the rug,” Priebus said. “Benghazi shouldn’t be swept under the rug: Four diplomats died. Boko Haram: These people have over 200 girls in Nigeria. The Syria issue, the Russian reset . . .”

Priebus also rejected Gregory’s claim that Clinton, the wife of former president Bill Clinton, is the candidate Republicans “most fear.”  

“Hillary’s a known product,” Priebus said. “I think it’s sometimes it’s worse running against a blank slate. Hillary has decades of history for us to explore. You know, her role in Hillarycare when she was first lady; her Senate experience, where there is nothing significant to point to; and her secretary of state experience, which was not just not significant but there’s all kinds of problems with it.”

Tags: Reince Priebus , Hillary Clinton , 2016 , Sunday Shows May 18 2014

Does the RNC Deserve the Blame for Cuccinelli’s Loss?



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Arguments in favor of blaming the Republican National Committee for Ken Cuccinelli’s defeat:

* At the end of September, the RNC had $11.2 million in cash on hand.

* The RNC spent $3 million in Virginia developing its “precinct team model” instead of television advertising, where Cuccinelli was getting creamed every commercial break.

* The RNC spent $1.5 million in New Jersey in a race Christie was certain to win anyway, including a half-million dollars on minorities who were open to voting Republican.

Arguments against blaming the Republican National Committee for Ken Cuccinelli’s defeat:

* Ken Cuccinelli’s campaign was always likely to be outspent by Terry McAuliffe, but he and his campaign had to try to keep the margin as close as possible. Instead, the gap became gargantuan, $15 million. To his credit, Cuccinelli raised only slightly less than McDonnell raised four years ago, $20 million to McDonnell’s $21 million.

* If the polling had shown a closer race, the RNC undoubtedly would have committed more money. But only two out of 25 polls conducted in Virginia since mid-September showed McAuliffe leading by less than 5 points. Most had the Democrat leading by 7 to 9 points.

* The $9 million that the RNC spent on behalf of Bob McDonnell in 2009 was part of the Michael Steele’s big-borrowing, big-spending era, which took the committee from $23 million in the bank at the beginning of 2009 (mostly from transfers from unused funds of the McCain-Palin campaign) to $22 million in debt. Today the RNC has no debt.

* The RNC is a “hard money” institution, meaning there are limits on how much a donor can give. Virginia’s laws limiting donations and activity is much more lax, meaning both Cuccinelli and the state party were free to accept much larger donations. At any point, any wealthy Republican billionaire could have written a check for $10 million helping out Cuccinelli. For example, Bill Clinton wrote a check for $100,000 to McAuliffe.

* Next year, the RNC faces a gargantuan lift. There are a good half-dozen or so competitive Senate races against Democrat incumbents (Alaska, Arkansas, perhaps Colorado, Louisiana, possibly Minnesota, New Hampshire, North Carolina, possibly Oregon, possibly Virginia), open-seat Senate races in Iowa, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, and West Virginia, and potentially vulnerable Senate incumbents to defend in Kentucky and Maine. Then they have competitive gubernatorial races against Democrat incumbents in Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, and perhaps a few others, open-seat gubernatorial races in Arizona, Arkansas, Massachusetts, and Nebraska, and vulnerable gubernatorial incumbents to defend in Florida, Maine, Michigan, possibly Nevada, possibly New Mexico, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. And then there are the House races. Put simply, there are only so many races where the RNC can commit $5 million to 10 million.

* According to OpenSecrets.org, the DNC spent nothing or (depending on some late filing of forms) next to nothing on McAuliffe.

Tags: Ken Cuccinelli , RNC , Reince Priebus , Terry McAuliffe

Could NBC’s Hillary Docu-Drama End Up Canceled?



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This is an interesting, if unconfirmed, rumor:

NBC sources tell FTVLive that the NBC suits have figured the Clinton miniseries “just isn’t worth it.”

Word is that NBC is going to let it quietly go away without saying a word.

NBC does not want to make it look like the RNC or their own news people “got [their] way,” so the project will likely die in the “in development” stage.

One NBC source told FTVLive that the miniseries has gone from a 90% “go” to more like a a 60% “No go.” 

If this scenario comes to pass, doesn’t Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus suddenly become a hero to the GOP grassroots, as “The Guy Who Got the Hillary Biopic Canceled”? Or would the comments from Chuck Todd, Andrea Mitchell, and Robert Gibbs be considered bigger factors?

Tags: Hillary Clinton , NBC , RNC , Reince Priebus

How Each Party Responds to TV Programming It Disdains



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There is legitimate outrage over RNC Chairman Reince Priebus and his threatening response to NBC over their planned miniseries about Hillary Clinton. From Priebus’ letter to NBC:

Presenting such deeply flawed and factually inaccurate misinformation to the American public and to children would be a gross miscarriage of your corporate and civic responsibility to the law, to your shareholders, and to the nation.
The Communications Act of 1934 provides your network with a free broadcast license predicated on the fundamental understanding of your principle obligation to act as a trustee of the public airwaves in serving the public interest. Nowhere is this public interest obligation more apparent than in the duty of broadcasters to serve the civic needs of a democracy by promoting an open and accurate discussion of political ideas and events.
We urge you, after full consideration of the facts, to uphold your responsibilities as a respected member of American society and as a beneficiary of the free use of the public airwaves to cancel this factually inaccurate and deeply misguided program. We look forward to hearing back from you soon.

Oh, wait, that’s not from Priebus. That’s a letter from Senators Harry Reid, Dick Durbin, Debbie Stabenow, Chuck Schumer, Byron Dorgan, to ABC over their made-for-TV docu-drama, “The Path to 9/11.”

Priebus’ move is to threaten to refuse to partner with NBC in 2016 primary debates or sanction primary debates they sponsor.

Apples and oranges? Well, the Hillary Clinton film is not finished yet, so it’s theoretically possible it could turn into a work that left, right and center agree is a fair, accurate, and balanced portrait of the woman widely believed to be the front-runner to be the Democrats’ presidential nominee in 2016. But… come on. You don’t sign Diane Lane to play Lady MacBeth

“The Path to 9/11″ featured certain scenes that were indeed wildly exaggerated dramatizations, i.e., Sandy Berger hanging up on CIA agent who has penetrated Osama bin Laden’s compound. The makers of “The Path to 9/11″ undoubtedly believed they were using dramatic license to depict a true set of circumstances, i.e., official hesitation to authorize the use of force in Afghanistan in the late 1990s. (More on the fights over that film here.) 

But conforming real-life events to fit the traditional narrative and tropes of a dramatic story what makes a docu-drama a docu-drama, and one of the most frustrating aspects of these films. Some real-life person gets turned into a hero or villain based upon a few scenes or lines of dialog, and the vast majority of the viewing audience will never pick up a nonfiction book or other materials to double-check the filmmakers’ portrayal. In most cases, the legend overtakes the truth; Bob Woodward’s source, Deep Throat, never said “Follow the money.” Yet he is best known for a line from a screenwriter’s imagination.

Given a choice, should political figures object to films by cutting off debate access or threatening their broadcast license? Sponsoring a presidential debate is a privilege; Reid’s threat cut straight to the heart of ABC’s entire existence. 

Tags: Reince Priebus , Harry Reid , Hillary Clinton

RNC: Come See Our New ‘Growth and Opportunity Project’



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The Republican National Committee has unveiled its web site for its “Growth and Opportunity Project,” an initiative established to help grow the Republican party and influence future Republican campaigns. At this point, the site’s primary feature is a survey.

I discussed the project with RNC chairman Reince Priebus back in December, and one of the noteworthy ideas was the RNC changing the rules and setup for the 2016 presidential primary, as well as attempting to provide some structure and order to the presidential-debate schedule in the primaries:

GERAGHTY: One of the intriguing points I saw raised in the discussions that this group has had is the recommendation of changes to the presidential-primary schedule. Are you hoping to see changes in how the primaries are set up?

PRIEBUS: One of the major topics that people discuss is the debate issue — controlling the debates and tying the nomination process to the debate calendar — is something we’re going to look at. Now, we didn’t have that opportunity two years ago; there is no mechanism to tie the nomination process to the debate calendar. But we have that opportunity now. We can do that with a three-quarters vote of the Republican National Committee. Here’s a hypothetical. The RNC could hypothetically say, “Look, here’s the debate calendar. Here are the moderators. We’re going to have one debate a month starting on this day.” And adherence to the calendar will be a requirement to achieving the nomination to the presidency — either through bonus delegates or penalties of delegates subtracted. There is one major reason that a presidential candidate needs the Republican party: To get on the ballot in November, a presidential candidate must get a majority of delegates at a national convention to vote for him or her. If the presidential candidate can’t make that happen, he or she is not on the ballot. So that is one idea that we will be looking at.

If you have ten presidential candidates, and seven out of ten or eight out of ten will take whatever two-hour slot that is open to them, then you end up with a debate any time some cable network decides to hold one. You can’t control that situation. Our endeavor is to come up with some idea that helps us control that situation.

Tags: Reince Priebus , RNC

RNC May Try to Limit Number, Format of GOP Debates in 2016



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Over on the home page, I have an interview with Reince Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee, mostly discussing the RNC”s new Growth and Opportunity Project, which is led by a five-member panel that will review their operations and strategies and those of the Republican party as a whole. Perhaps most intriguing and newsworthy was Priebus’s comment about an effort to limit the number of GOP presidential-primary debates and the format in 2016.

GERAGHTY: One of the intriguing points I saw raised in the discussions that this group has had is the recommendation of changes to the presidential-primary schedule. Are you hoping to see changes in how the primaries are set up?

PRIEBUS: One of the major topics that people discuss is the debate issue — controlling the debates and tying the nomination process to the debate calendar is something we’re going to look at. Now, we didn’t have that opportunity two years ago; there is no mechanism to tie the nomination process to the debate calendar. But we have that opportunity now. We can do that with a three-quarters vote of the Republican National Committee. Here’s a hypothetical. The RNC could hypothetically say, “Look, here’s the debate calendar. Here are the moderators. We’re going to have one debate a month starting on this day.” And adherence to the calendar will be a requirement to achieving the nomination to the presidency — either through bonus delegates or penalties of delegates subtracted. There is one major reason that a presidential candidate needs the Republican party: To get on the ballot in November, a presidential candidate must get a majority of delegates at a national convention to vote for him or her. If the presidential candidate can’t make that happen, he or she is not on the ballot. So that is one idea that we will be looking at.

If you have ten presidential candidates, and seven out of ten or eight out of ten will take whatever two-hour slot that is open to them, then you end up with a debate any time some cable network decides to hold one. You can’t control that situation. Our endeavor is to come up with some idea that helps us control that situation.

There were 20 debates last cycle, including seven between January 7 and February 22. More than a few analysts wondered if the seemingly endless succession of debates hurt the Republican brand, with the time and attention divided between nine candidates some evenings, and some of those candidates having little support.

Even if every candidate on stage was worth serious consideration, it’s easy to argue that having 20 debates, and sometimes more than one per week, made each individual debate less newsworthy and important. Many of the answers sounded the same (particularly when shoehorned into two minutes or less), and after a while they sounded like contests to see which candidates could denounce Obama the most, pledge genuine economic recovery the most, praise the Tea Party the most, and so on. Voters could learn just as much about the candidates in five or ten debates.

Quite a few conservatives didn’t like some of the moderators this time around (George Stephanopoulos asking the candidates about states’ banning contraception, etc.). Perhaps the RNC will contemplate a stipulation that no former Democratic lawmakers’ staffers may moderate one of the debates.

Tags: Presidential Debates , Reince Priebus , RNC

Look Closely at the Cash-on-Hand Numbers . . .



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Two quick questions.

Doesn’t this . . .

President Barack Obama has more than $88 million available to spend for the presidential campaign’s final stretch, giving him a sizable cash-on-hand advantage over Mitt Romney. . . . Romney has $50.4 million available to him at this point in the campaign.

. . . seem less important when you know this?

The RNC, which has consistently been crushing the Democratic National Committee in fundraising, reported having $75.6 million at the end of August. The DNC ended the month with $7.1 million.

Romney cash on hand + RNC cash on hand = $126 million.

Obama cash on hand + DNC cash on hand = $95 million.

And while I’m sure the chairman and his gang would be the first to say we should hold the applause until after November, isn’t the performance of Reince Priebus and his team at the RNC pretty stunning, considering the state of the committee when former chairman Michael Steele left it in early 2011?

UPDATE: My math is based upon the media accounts cited above; the RNC has other, higher numbers they’re distributing this morning:

  • Cash On Hand: Romney/RNC $168.5 million vs. Obama/DNC: $125.1 million
  • RNC: $76.5 million vs. DNC: $7.1 million
  • 23 million voter contacts made by 65,000 volunteers
  • More than 1.9 million swing voters identified since the start of the Victory voter contact program
  • Surpassed the McCain ’08 campaign in total volunteer voter contacts

Tags: DNC , Reince Priebus , RNC

Priebus on Chris Matthews: ‘He Made the Case for Us.’



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Shortly before our chat, Republican National Committee chair Reince Priebus held a brief press “gaggle” in the media center, and briefly talked about his exchange with Chris Matthews on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” this morning.

(Video can be found at Hot Air here; among Matthews’s accusations was: “This stuff about getting rid of the work requirement for welfare is dishonest, everyone’s pointed out it’s dishonest, and you are playing that little ethnic card there. You can play your games and giggle about it, but the fact is your side is playing that card. When you start talking about work requirements, we know what game you’re playing, and everybody knows what game you’re playing, it’s a race card.”)

“When someone wants to grab the flag and try to be the biggest jerk in the room, sometimes you just let them go,” the chairman said with a laugh.

“We shook hands, but I will tell ya that someone from MSNBC, I don’t know if it’s a producer or somebody, has been trying to call us all day — I’m sure it’s to make amends, but there’s nothing to make amends [about]. When somebody wants to take the prize of being the biggest jerk in the room . . . I mean, he made the case for us. This is the Barack Obama surrogate of 2012. This is what they’re all about. They’re going to be about division, they’re going to be about distraction. And I’ve got to tell you, the brand of Barack Obama, hope and change and bringing us all together, it’s completely broken. When people come to realize that you’re not real anymore, you’re not who you said you were, that’s a big problem for Barack Obama.”

Asked if he would go on MSNBC again, he said, “I’m happy to go on MSNBC. Joe and Mika, they weren’t too happy about it. The feeling in the room was clearly there was a lot of unhappiness directed at Chris. I don’t really care. If more than 10 people actually watched his show, I would actually care, but they don’t, so, whatever.”

Tags: MSNBC , Reince Priebus

Priebus: No Schedule Changes Planned, but ‘We Have to Be Nimble’



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I just completed a quick interview with RNC chair Reince Priebus.

NRO: Isaac’s threat to Tampa appears to be passing, but there may be a serious threat to some other states. Do you have any worries or thoughts about changing the schedule if there’s a severe threat to New Orleans or to the Gulf Coast?

Priebus: Right now, I have not had a single discussion about doing anything other than going forward with the events and the schedule that we have planned. I will say, though, that we have to be nimble. And everyone can see that we can be nimble if we need to be. We have the ability to make alternative plans if we have to, but right now we feel that our message of the American dream and fixing this economy and putting ourselves on the right track for the future of this country — I think it’s a positive message and it’s a message that will always be good. When we’re optimistic about the future and how we’re going to fix this great country and put people back to work, it’s a message that works all the time.

Certainly, we have to be mindful of the effects of the hurricane and what that means to people who are pretty close by here.

NRO: This is traditionally one of the points of the year when the candidate really gets his chance to make his sales pitch to the American people. Any worries about a split screen on the cable news networks, or other big news events going on and getting in the way of the candidate getting to make his pitch to the people?

Priebus: It is what it is, right? So we have a hurricane, and we have three days to have this convention and nominate Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan. We understand completely — they’re all newsworthy events. Competition among events is not uncommon, and we think it’s important for people to stay informed about the storm as well.

It’s just a balance. I think tone is important, but when you see how we’re operating at the convention, you’ll see we have a very respectful tone. Obviously, the message is about how we can provide a better future for America, and that’s a tone that works with everything.

NRO: You said at a briefing a few moments ago that [former Gov. Mike] Huckabee will be speaking Wednesday night. Were there ever any discussions about removing him from the speaker’s list for the controversy and his defense of Akin?

Priebus: No. It’s one thing to have a dispute with Congressman Akin. That’s one thing. Akin’s the one who put himself in this place. That’s one level of argument. But then to say that because you think that we should just move on, as opposed to me thinking he should step down and let someone else carry the water, that’s sort of a couple steps removed from the issue. I think that’s a little bit different.

NRO: Had you read his e-mail defending Akin?

Priebus: Sure, I read it. He’s entitled. Having an opinion — Mike Huckabee’s not the one who said the biologically stupid things. So it’s different.

NRO: One of the discussions here at the convention is people wondering about the bump that Romney will get, and whether it will be up to the traditional levels.  Some folks are wondering if it’s possible to get the traditional bump, with such a polarized electorate and so few undecided voters left. Are you expecting a bump, and if so, how large?

Priebus: I think we’re going to have a base that is energized and motivated. I think the convention is going to be great in telling the Mitt Romney story. Getting Americans to understand more about Mitt as a person and what his plans are for this country can only help us.

As far as assessing the bump and what percent, you know, the media cycle is so different nowadays. We’re just so saturated these days, and because the media is constant nowadays . . . Conventions of the past had a four-day event that was the only huge political news for the summer. I think it’s a different time now . . .

I think we’re going to be motivated, I think it’s great for our base, it’s a great opportunity to tell people who Mitt Romney is, introduce him to people who don’t know him yet, and I’m optimistic that we’ll have a good result.

NRO: I realize the decision to hold the convention in Tampa was made by your predecessor, but first, is it possible this is the last convention on the coast in the Southeast for a while, and second — let me guess, your first choice for the 2016 convention would be Milwaukee, right?

Priebus: (laughing) Milwaukee sounds great! But I’ll say this, in a rare defense of Michael Steele — we’ve had conventions in New Orleans, Houston, Miami, now we’re in Tampa — actually, New York could have had a hurricane. You could just eliminate so many places. This is just such an odd situation. I don’t blame him. The fact of the matter is, we’re happy to be here, the people of Tampa have been so hospitable . . .

And quite frankly, we’ve got to win Florida. And there’s no better place for us to spend our time and our money and our energy than Florida. So I’m happy we’re here.

Tags: Reince Priebus , Republican National Convention , RNC

Priebus on Wisconsin: ‘We’ve been analyzing this state for two and a half years.’



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RNC chairman Reince Priebus on a conference call discussing the Wisconsin gubernatorial recall election:

“The RNC is all in in Wisconsin . . . Judging from Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s token appearance in the state today, and Stephanie Cutter’s comments on MSNBC today, apparently [Obama for America] and the DNC are all in . . . We’re looking forward to seeing what their top-notch ground game will accomplish in November. Democrats have been all over the map on Tom Barrett and this Wisconsin recall.”

“To highlight the GOP unity for Scott Walker, we’ve announced a partnership with multiple state parties throughout the Midwest. Not only is the RNC full-bore on money and ground effort with Wisconsin, but also Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota state GOPs are assisting with volunteers as well. We’re announcing competitions for both state party and individual competition. We’ve made two million volunteer voter contacts in the state already, and we’re identifying nearly every Wisconsin voter. For perspective, it took the Obama campaign a year to make a million contacts nationwide.”

“We’re feeling very good about how we’re doing on absentee ballots right now.”

“If Wisconsin goes red, it’s lights out for Barack Obama. Putting it in the red column for the first time since 1984 would be a really big deal . . .  I don’t think there’s a state in the country where the GOP knows the voters better than Wisconsin . . . We’ve been analyzing this state for two and a half years. Contacting two and a half million voters, having all of that consumer data, the Prosser election, the state legislative recall challenges . . . You have a pattern here of success that is going to make it easier to win here in November.”

“We’re not seeing any fatigue on our side at all. One of the biggest problems that the Democrats have is that a decent number of Democrats tell pollsters and in focus groups, ‘we may not be Republicans, but we think this recall stuff is out of control. A legislative disagreement with Walker is not enough to have a recall and spend millions of dollars on that.’ To many Democrats, this is absurd. That’s a problem in their turnout model that they don’t know what to do with.”

“The idea of tracking early votes is not a process that is unknown or a vague reality to the state and national parties. We track early votes every day. We know what’s turned in. We know, to a reasonable degree of certainty, how those ballots look in comparison to the voting propensity of those voters, people who we believe to be GOP voters. We know if there are any major problems in early and absentee ballots. We feel very good right now about where we’re sitting regarding absentee ballots.”

“I’m always concerned about voter fraud. Being from Kenosha, I’ve seen it happen. We’ve seen it in Milwaukee. I think we need to be a point or two better than we think we are. Voter ID is constitutional and it has been upheld by the Supreme Court.” (Voter ID laws will not be in effect for the recall elections.)

Tags: Reince Priebus , Scott Walker , Wisconsin

Priebus: Obama’s Unofficial Campaigning Getting ‘Obnoxious’



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Over on the home page, I have a wide-ranging interview with Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus, including his filing of a complaint with the comptroller general of the Government Accountability Office, accusing President Obama of using government funds to stage campaign events and demanding a formal inquiry into the matter. Among his remarks:

Sometimes I think a there’s a special device strapped onto the bottom of Air Force One that allows it to land only in battleground states.

It also seems as if that million-dollar bus the president bought last summer just happened to go down every interstate highway of every battleground state, and never found its way into North Dakota and Tennessee.

What took so long? Like any legal analysis, the issue of what’s reasonable can change depending upon the facts. But the president has reached the point of obnoxiousness with campaigning on the taxpayer’s dime.

It wasn’t even credible to try to compare what Obama was doing in three and a half years with what George W. Bush did in eight years. He dwarfed anything Bush did. It reached a point where we said, “Listen, this is so out of line and obnoxious, we have to send this letter.” On the question of whether Obama’s people will blow it off or not, it was pretty interesting that we sent the letter at 4:30 and an hour later their campaign sent an e-mail for a 6:30 conference call, and then they released a statement that their official campaigning was about to begin. Is it a coincidence? I’m not sure, but it certainly looks as if it woke them up.

Tags: Barack Obama , Reince Priebus , RNC

Reince Priebus, Tossing His Hat in the Ring for RNC Chair



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It had been rumored for a while, and now it’s almost official:

Supporters of Wisconsin Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus formed a committee Monday to back him for national party chairman, another strong sign that Priebus will challenge Michael Steele for the position. Paperwork creating the so-called 527 committee called “Reince for RNC Chairman” was filed with the Internal Revenue Service. Creating the committee comes after Priebus resigned on Sunday as general counsel for the RNC, another strong indicator that he intends to run. Priebus, 38, has not formally announced his intention to challenge Steele, who has not said yet whether he will seek another two-year term… Priebus said in an e-mail to The Associated Press on Monday that will make an announcement about his candidacy soon.

In Wisconsin, Priebus can point to one of the quickest and most remarkable turnarounds for GOP fortunes.

UPDATE: The announcement video:

Tags: Reince Priebus

A ‘Secret Candidate’ for RNC Chair?



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I’m beginning to dig into the folks running or thinking about running for chairman of the Republican National Committee. Besides current chairman Michael Steele, there’s former Michigan GOP chair Saul Anuzis, former party chair Ann Wagner of Missouri, rumors surrounding Wisconsin party chairman Reince Priebus, and Maria Cino, a longtime GOP political operative who ran the 2008 Republican National Convention.

A Republican strategist who helped one of the aspiring chairs in the last contest tells me he was asked to stay on the sidelines for now, because a “secret candidate” is waiting in the wings. He said he has no idea who the secret candidate is or why they’re keeping the bid secret.

Well, WikiLeaks, we’re waiting.

(We’re also waiting for WikiLeaks to provide photos of the “voluptuous Ukrainian nurse” that Ghaddafi needs.)

UPDATE: Interesting speculation: Carly Fiorina.

Tags: Ann Wagner , Maria Cino , Michael Steele , Reince Priebus , Saul Anuzis

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