Politics & Policy

The Man from NR

Publisher praise in verse.

Editor’s note: National Review’s chairman, Thomas L. Rhodes read the following poem at Ed Capano’s retirement party earlier this week.

There once was a man from NR

He was known both here and afar

He has given his life

Just ask the wife!

Of that gentleman from NR

The gentleman’s name is Ed

About whom it is often said

He takes readers on cruises

Our subscribers he schmoozes

His trips even beat out Club Med

Our Ed is a talented dancer

Ask Margie — she’ll give you the answer

He gets up on those toes

One, two, three, four — he goes

You might even call him a prancer

He has guided out readers to Rome

To Moscow and even to Nome

His cruise down the Rhine

Was so mighty fine

No one wanted to head back to home

The man from NR runs a book

Which gets out by hook or by crook

It carries great ads

Some good and some bad

And a cover that has a great look

He fought lefties throughout the Cold War

He fought till his knuckles were sore

There were pinkos galore

All over the floor

Who were hoping to work for Al Gore

The man from NR is a star

His friends have come from afar

He says he’ll retire

Just sit by the fire

And bring his golf score down to par

The man from NR has got clout

The man from NR gets about

He’s been here to lead

He’s planted a seed

Of this there should not be a doubt

Thank you Ed for serving this great conservative cause.

When the bad guys are throwing hand grenades, there is no one I would rather be in the foxhole with. You will be missed but never forgotten and you’re only a river away — God Bless!

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