Politics & Policy

Recreating ’68 in Denver?

DNC protests fizzle, but not for lack of trying.

Denver, Colorado — With the Democratic Convention coming to town, Denver police had braced themselves for some 50,000 protesters. They built a massive holding pen in a nearby warehouse ringed with concertina wire and fretted about how there were more police working the 2000 Democratic convention in Los Angeles then there were in the entire state of Colorado.

There had been plenty of threats made; leftist groups such as Recreate ‘68 and the Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army were threatening to overwhelm the city. Protest organizers started meeting with police to coordinate activities over a year ago. Not that it did much good; once protesters found out about the cops’ makeshift pokey and the fact that cops wanted to confine protesters to a designated protest area, they screamed about the alleged injustice being thrown in their own private Guantanamo. In anticipation, street vendors were selling T-shirts with a picture of an AK-47 that said “Defend Denver.”

By the time the anticipated march finally happened Sunday, it had been rerouted so that marchers could stop and protest the protest area. A group of also anarchists decided they would forgo the preordained parade route and “take back the streets.” Once they realized that the protesters weren’t sticking to the city’s pre-approved plans, the police put the Pepsi Center in Denver on lockdown for over an hour, not letting anyone in or out of the main convention venue.

But despite Recreate ‘68’s ominous name and and the chaos at the Pepsi center, in the end the march fizzled spectacularly. Only about 1,000 people showed up. Later that night, one of the march organizers raged against the real culprit for the march’s failure: “They have pigs on every corner with their new weapons technologies and then they’re surprised when the masses don’t turn out,” the organizer said.

Sure, it’s hard to pass up an opportunity to blame “the pigs,” but there are other possible explanations for the underwhelming turnout. When you consider some of Barack Obama’s political allies back in Chicago, you might reasonably conclude that the radical Left are perfectly satisfied with his candidacy — that he is the bombthrower’s choice. Or it may simply be that Recreate ‘68 went to the protest store and found that they were all out of crazy. That at least is how it appeared to those of us that had the privilege of witnessing the meager march.

Or alternatively, we could investigate services provided by a local mental health professional.

Wouldn’t it be easier if we stay here and blast this guy into space?

As a matter of fact, the number of Mormon socialists can fit into a phone booth.

The enemy of my enemy is… still crazy.

Either this is another tranny for peace, or this guy is very confused.

How much did you say you would you have to drink before you’re willing to vote for Nader?

He doesn’t look like a guy who knows the difference between a subject and object pronoun.

If loving the satanic incarnation of George Bush is wrong, he doesn’t want to be right.

Mark Hemingway is an NRO staff reporter.

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