Politics & Policy

Romanoff Receives Last Minute Clinton Lift, Clarifies “Anti-Establishment, Pro-Administration” Campaign

The Presidential battle in Colorado’s Democratic U.S. Senate contest received one more entry in the final day before the August 10 primary, as former President Bill Clinton sent out a robo-call on behalf of Andrew Romanoff.

President Barack Obama joined a tele-town hall last week to boost the flagging Sen. Michael Bennet and also recorded a robo-call as well. Obama joined Bennet earlier in the year for a fundraiser (seen in an ad from the Bennet campaign), while Clinton has remained confined to an endorsement email issued in June and this get-out-the-vote push.

Romanoff is trying to straddle the anti-establishment, pro-administration line:

“It is possible to be pro-Obama and pro-Romanoff at the same time,” Romanoff told CBS News correspondent Bob Orr. “I am, and thousands of Coloradans like me who support the president, point out that this decision gets made in Colorado.”

Romanoff said the Democratic National Committee is running a phone bank out of its Washington headquarters to “undermine our grassroots effort.”

“That doesn’t sit well with a lot of people in this state and is ultimately likely to be an inffective approach to have folks in Washington tell us what to do,” he said.

Romanoff addressed the on-going PAC funding controversy stoked by Bennet and sought to explain his anti-insider messaging:

**Update–not sure what is causing the video to offset, but it will play if you click on the image.

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