Politics & Policy

S.F. Giants May Force Fans to Leave Their Indian Headdresses at Home

Giants fans celebrate after the World Series, November 2010 (Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
The San Francisco team considers banning politically incorrect clothing from its stadium.

The San Francisco Giants might ban fans from wearing politically incorrect clothing or using culturally insensitive language at baseball games. Fans of teams with Indian names have worn feathers and war paint to baseball games for a long time, but it could be coming to an end in the Bay Area.

Fans who sport the forbidden attire, such as fake Native American headdresses, “redface,” feathers, or war paint, or those who say something deemed offensive, could be questioned by Giants security or potentially told to leave the stadium, the San Francisco Examiner reported.

The proposed policy developed after an incident at a Giants game in June when two Native Americans, April Negrette and Kimball Bighorse, asked a man to remove his headdress. One of the Native Americans took the headdress and refused to return it, so security detained Negrette and Bighorse but did not arrest them. The kerfuffle happened on Native American Heritage Night.

Bighorse was among the Native American activists who met with Giants officials to discuss how to prevent more such incidents.

American Indian activist Suzan Shown Harjo told USA Today that this ban would be a first for a major-league sports franchise. Staci Slaughter, a Giants senior vice president, said the team already has policies pertaining to obscene language and offensive signs.

“We met with some folks as a result of the incident,” Slaughter told USA Today. “What we’re looking at is not just specific to Native Americans. We have a desire to educate folks. The reason we do these heritage nights is to raise the awareness of the diversity of our region.”

The sports world got a little more politically correct recently when a panel of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Trademark Trial and Appeal Board ruled in favor of plaintiffs claiming that the Washington Redskins name “may disparage persons or bring them into contempt, or disrepute,” divesting the team of six trademarks.

The first step toward implementing the Giants ban would be informing fans and staff of new rules to ensure they understand them, Slaughter said.

— Celina Durgin is a Franklin Center intern at National Review Online.

Most Popular

Culture

School Shootings and the Incentives of Violence

Today’s Morning Jolt discusses school shootings and the common difficulties of the teenage years, and I thought of another aspect that I forgot to include -- the degree to which our society, in its reaction to violence, inadvertently rewards that violence. Every teenager wants attention, to be recognized, to ... Read More
NR Marketing

Down the Home Stretch

Our Spring 2018 Webathon winds up this week. El jefe, Mr. Lowry, makes the case, wonderfully, for your participating, even at this final stage. In case you need some visual inspiration, we’ll use this horse race image from the novel Ben Hur (you'll remember the 1959 movie version starred the late NR ... Read More
Immigration

On a Willful Lie from the Press

This claim is omnipresent on social media and beyond: Trump lashed out at undocumented immigrants during a White House meeting, calling those trying to breach the country’s borders “animals” https://t.co/aQNeu29T6e pic.twitter.com/ogrFKaWyDZ — The New York Times (@nytimes) May 16, 2018 Peruse ... Read More
PC Culture

The Nature of Progressive Insensitivity

Former vice president Joe Biden is back in the news yet again. For a second time, he seems surprised that poor residents of the inner city are capable of doing sophisticated jobs: We don't think ordinary people can do things like program, code. It's not rocket science, guys. So, we went and we hired some folks ... Read More
Culture

The Feminization of Everything Fails Our Boys

Let me share with you two troubling — and, I believe, closely linked — news reports. The first, from this weekend, comes courtesy of the American Enterprise Institute’s Mark Perry. In one chart, he highlights the dramatic and growing gender gap in higher education. In short, women are dominating: ... Read More