Politics & Policy

Harvard to Stop Buying SodaStream Machines Because They’re a ‘Microaggression’

Ivy League water torture
The college will immediately remove SodaStream stickers from existing machines so no one gets upset.

Harvard University Dining Services has decided stop buying water machines from the Israeli company SodaStream due to concerns that their very presence might be a microaggression against Palestinian students.

“These machines can be seen as a microaggression to Palestinian students and their families and like the University doesn’t care about Palestinian human rights,” Rachel J. Sandalow-Ash, sophomore and  member of the Harvard College Progressive Jewish Alliance, told the Harvard Crimson.

In the meantime, the school will also be removing the “SodaStream” stickers from any of the existing water machines, just to make sure no student has to see one and have a traumatic experience or something.

Currently, the SodaStream’s main factory is located in the West Bank, territory Israel and the Palestinian Authority have long fought over. In October, however, the company announced that it would be moving the factory out of the contested area and into southern Israel.

But apparently that’s not enough — these water fountains are still just too offensive to remain on campus. There’s not even a trigger warning posted in the dining hall!

The move is in response to concerns raised by the College Palestine Solidarity Committee and the Harvard Islamic Society last fall.

SodaStream specializes in a build-your-own soda experience — which, for what it’s worth, can be kinda cool and fun.

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter for National Review Online.

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