Culture

Cho’s Not Offensive, Telling a Korean American She Can’t Make Fun of Kim Jong Un Is

Cho (center) with Golden Globes hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler
Don't they realize how belittling they are?

Korean-American comedian Margaret Cho did an impression of a North Korean general at the Golden Globes that many on Liberal Twitter attacked as racist because apparently not even people of Korean descent are allowed to make fun of Kim Jong Un.

In one of many jokes aimed at the recent Sony cyber-hack, Cho wore a Korean general costume and made fun of the lack of spectacle at the event:

“You no have thousand baby playing guitar at the same time. You no have people holding up many card to make one big picture,” she said in a thick accent. “You no have Dennis Rodman.”

Predictably, people went nuts.

The Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner said Cho was “like, totes racist.” Time deputy tech editor Alex Fitzpatrick questioned how anyone could have seen the bit as anything but “broadly racist.” The International Business Times managing editor called the decision to allow it a “bad call.” And that’s just to name a few.

Cho defended herself, tweeting: “I’m of mixed North/South Korean descent — you imprison, starve and brainwash my people you get made fun of by me #hatersgonhate.”

She later added:

“I am from this culture. I am from this tribe. And so I’m able to comment on it.”

I mean, duh. She’s obviously right. The uproar of accusations that she was being racist against herself really goes to show the hypocrisy and ignorance that’s ingrained into the political-correctness movement.

They say it’s offensive for her to make fun of a tyrant that has oppressed people of her own race. But you know what’s really offensive? Telling someone how she’s allowed to respond to the tragedies faced by the people of her own race.

Thinking you’re some kind of social-justice hero for telling someone she was wrong for the way she dealt with the issues of her own community is ignorant, arrogant, and far more belittling than anything she could have said would have been. 

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter at National Review Online.

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