Culture

Professor: White People Are Conditioned to Commit Mass Murder Like in Charleston

Zandria Robinson

Editor’s Note: After the publication of this article, the University of Memphis announced that Zandria Robinson was no longer employed at the university (see update below).

A professor at the University of Memphis suggested that the Charleston shooter was not mentally ill but rather just another example of “white people acting how they’re conditioned to act.”

Assistant professor of sociology Zandria Robinson — whose Twitter account is promoted on the school’s official website — posted a tweet following the Charleston shooting suggesting that the killer’s actions were a result of his whiteness:

Robinson also posted a tweet on June 26 declaring that “Whiteness is most certainly and inevitably terror.” It has since been deleted, but not before being captured by the blog SoCawlege.

This is not the first time Robinson has made the news for her inflammatory social-media posts. According to Campus Reform, Robinson wrote a Facebook post last November preemptively threatening anyone who might be thinking of saying anything about minority students gaining admittance to graduate programs because of their race — even if they were joking:

“SO DON’T YOU EVER LET ME HEAR TELL OF YOU PERPETUATING THESE RACIST LIES AGAIN. NOT EVEN IN YOUR HEAD. NOT EVEN IN JEST. Because if you do I will come for you. And I will do so in public.”

The above post has since been deleted from her Facebook page. It’s still not clear how Robinson has the ability to see inside of other people’s heads.

Robinson still has a job at the public, taxpayer-funded university.

UPDATEA University of Memphis spokesperson told National Review that Robinson was no longer working at the school, but refused to give further details – promising to release a statement on the issue soon. In the meantime, the school has posted the following on its Twitter account:

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter for National Review.  

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