Politics & Policy

Poll: Voters Call Hillary ‘Liar,’ ‘Dishonest,’ ‘Untrustworthy’

(Scott Olson/Getty)

Voters have a dimmer view of Hillary Clinton’s integrity than ever before, according to a new survey that shows “‘liar’ is the first word that comes to mind” when people hear her name.

The new national poll, conducted by Quinnipiac, asked voters to name the words that came to mind when the Democratic presidential frontrunner was mentioned. After “liar,” the word most commonly associated with Clinton was “dishonest.” The third-ranked word was “untrustworthy.” 61 percent of respondents said Clinton was not “honest and trustworthy,” her “lowest score ever” by that metric, according to the pollster.

The survey comes as Clinton’s various explanations for her exclusive use of a private, unsecured e-mail account and server to conduct government business while serving as secretary of state have fallen apart.

“I know people have raised questions about my e-mail use as secretary of state, and I understand why,” she said Wednesday. “I take responsibility for that decision, and I want to be as transparent as possible, which is why I turned over 55,000 pages, why I’ve turned over my server, why I’ve agreed to — in fact, been asking to — and have finally gotten a date to testify before a congressional committee in October.”

#related#Clinton will testify before the Benghazi Committee on October 22. Two of her senior aides will appear for sworn depositions next week, but Chairman Trey Gowdy (R., S.C.) has been frustrated in his efforts to obtain their e-mails ahead of the hearing. “What can I do to make the Department of State produce Jake Sullivan’s e-mails to me? I’ve asked. I’ve sent a subpoena. I don’t know what else I can do. I can’t send the FBI to get him,” Gowdy said on Tuesday. “I have a freshman in college who could go pull up all of her e-mails and have them printed off by this afternoon. I don’t know what takes so long, but it’s been months and months and months. And we still don’t have all the documents we’ve asked for.”

— Joel Gehrke is a political reporter for National Review.

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