Politics & Policy

Trump Defends Putin over Assassinating Journalists

Donald Trump, who last night said it’s a “great honor” that Russia’s Vladimir Putin called him “talented,” this morning defended the Russian strongman over his record of murdering journalists.

Appearing on Morning Joe, Mika Brzezinski asked Trump if he liked Putin’s comments. “Sure,” he replied. “When people call you brilliant it’s always good, especially when the person heads up Russia.”

“Well, also a person that kills journalists, political opponents, and invades countries. Obviously, that would be a concern, would it not?” countered co-host Joe Scarborough. 

“He’s running his country and at least he’s a leader. You know, unlike what we have in this country,” Trump responded. 

“But again, he kills journalists that don’t agree with him,” returned Scarborough.

“Well, I think our country does plenty of killing also, Joe,” Trump said. ”There’s a lot of stupidity going on in the world right now, Joe. A lot of killing going on and a lot of stupidity and that’s the way it is.”

#share#Scarborough then offered Trump a way out, which Trump took:

SCARBOROUGH: I’m confused. So you obviously condemn Putin killing journalists and political opponents, right?

TRUMP: Oh sure, absolutely.

However, Trump went back to complimenting Putin a moment later, praising his high approval rating among Russians, which Trumped cited at “in the 80s.”

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