Culture

UC Davis: Saying ‘You Guys’ Is Using ‘Words That Hurt’

Oversensitivity 101

A guide titled “Words That Hurt” on the website of the University of California,  Davis, warns students to avoid using the phrase “you guys” — because, apparently, that’s really harmful or something.

“You guys [e]rases the identities of people who are in the room,” the guide states. It “generaliz[es] a group of people to be masculine.”

The purpose of the guide, which is published on the school’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual Resource Center, is to remind students that “sometimes we say words without realizing the impact they may have on others.”

Sorry, but . . . no. If someone is actually “hurt” by  hearing another person walk into a room and say, “Hey you guys!” then that person is the one with the problem. This should not be something that has an “impact” on you. I’m a woman; I hear it every day, and I have not even once found it remotely offensive . . . let alone suffered from some kind of “impact” from hearing it. Now, perhaps some of these kids might say that I just must be warrior-strong emotionally to feel this way, but I am inclined to believe that my attitude on this non-issue issue is actually normal and healthy — and that a person attending college really should be able to handle something like that without needing the school to intervene.

The list also includes the words “lame” and “crazy.” Now, to me, saying “wow, this concert is lame” or “wow, this storm is so crazy” seems like, you know, fine. The guide, however, insists that doing so “targets mental, emotional, and physical disabilities as objects for ridicule.”

The guide also claims that calling someone “ugly” is not only mean, but also a term that “can be connected back to white supremacisst#..#standards of beauty.”

#related#Perhaps the most interesting thing, however, is that the entry for the word “b****” specifies that the word is unacceptable to use “in any language.” Is this distinction intended to suggest that it is okay to say the other words as long as they’re said in another language? 

The guide was previously reported on in an article on The College Fix.

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter for National Review Online. 

 

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