UC Davis: Saying ‘You Guys’ Is Using ‘Words That Hurt’

Oversensitivity 101

A guide titled “Words That Hurt” on the website of the University of California,  Davis, warns students to avoid using the phrase “you guys” — because, apparently, that’s really harmful or something.

“You guys [e]rases the identities of people who are in the room,” the guide states. It “generaliz[es] a group of people to be masculine.”

The purpose of the guide, which is published on the school’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual Resource Center, is to remind students that “sometimes we say words without realizing the impact they may have on others.”

Sorry, but . . . no. If someone is actually “hurt” by  hearing another person walk into a room and say, “Hey you guys!” then that person is the one with the problem. This should not be something that has an “impact” on you. I’m a woman; I hear it every day, and I have not even once found it remotely offensive . . . let alone suffered from some kind of “impact” from hearing it. Now, perhaps some of these kids might say that I just must be warrior-strong emotionally to feel this way, but I am inclined to believe that my attitude on this non-issue issue is actually normal and healthy — and that a person attending college really should be able to handle something like that without needing the school to intervene.

The list also includes the words “lame” and “crazy.” Now, to me, saying “wow, this concert is lame” or “wow, this storm is so crazy” seems like, you know, fine. The guide, however, insists that doing so “targets mental, emotional, and physical disabilities as objects for ridicule.”

The guide also claims that calling someone “ugly” is not only mean, but also a term that “can be connected back to white supremacisst#..#standards of beauty.”

#related#Perhaps the most interesting thing, however, is that the entry for the word “b****” specifies that the word is unacceptable to use “in any language.” Is this distinction intended to suggest that it is okay to say the other words as long as they’re said in another language? 

The guide was previously reported on in an article on The College Fix.

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter for National Review Online. 


Most Popular


For the First Time in Weeks, Relief Sweeps over Austin

Making the click-through worthwhile: The Austin bomber is done in by one of his own devices; some new numbers suggest that a small but significant portion of Trump voters are tiring of the chaos and aren’t showing up to support other Republicans in 2018; and the mixed news for conservatives coming out of the ... Read More

The Baleful Effect of #MeToo on Campus

Remember the series of hurricanes that pounded the Caribbean last summer? Something like that has been occurring on college campuses, as they're hit by one destructive mania after another: diversity, Title IX, anti-speech protests. Now it's the #MeToo Movement. In this Martin Center article, British academic ... Read More
Politics & Policy

March Mailbag

1. In response to this post, about the Fed and fiscal stimulus: “So are you saying that deficit spending is a free lunch because the Fed will keep inflation from happening? You say [extra government spending] won’t ‘raise economic output’ but what’s the harm of it if you’re right?” I see at least ... Read More


For your amusement, I hope, I’ve done a Jaywalking episode. It begins with a bit of the overture to Semiramide -- a Rossini opera I reviewed from the Met last week. Then I get into Russia and, after a while, China. The Marriott company fired an employee for “liking” a tweet by a Tibetan independence group. ... Read More