Culture

University Archaeology Instructor Allows Students to Leave Class if Archaeology Triggers Them

A lecturer at the University College London is telling his “archaeologies of modern conflict” students that they can feel free to leave during class if they’re concerned that any of the material might be too triggering for them to handle. 

According to an article in the Daily Mail, the lecturer, Gabriel Moshenska, warned his students that the class will cover “historical events that may be disturbing, even traumatising,” and that they can “step outside” “without penalty” if they’re concerned something might make them uncomfortable.

Moshenska said he offered the option mainly out of concern for military veterans, but that no one has actually used it yet. That may be a small win for sanity, but the fact that Moshenska even offered it in the first place is still ridiculous. After all, the name of the class is “archaeologies of modern conflict.” Anyone enrolled went in knowing, based on what words mean, that they had signed up up to study archeology as related to “modern conflict,” and I’m sure that they were smart enough to know that “conflict” probably referred to things like war and not things like text-message fights. 

Sure, history can be disturbing. War can be disturbing. Bones can be disturbing. But, as Reason’​s Robby Soave points out, “if digging up bones or discussing warfare is triggering for a student, then that student probably shouldn’t be studying archaeology,” just as “people who faint at the sight of blood shouldn’t become nurses.” 

I mean, seriously. You know what is the mark of a good archaeologist? Not being terrified of archaeology. College is about preparing for a career, and if you’re too scared to do what you need to do to prepare for the one you picked, then pick something else. It really is that simple. 

Most Popular

The Trail Leading Back to the Wuhan Labs

It is understandable that many would be wary of the notion that the origin of the coronavirus could be discovered by some documentary filmmaker who used to live in China. Matthew Tye, who creates YouTube videos, contends he has identified the source of the coronavirus — and a great deal of the information that ... Read More

The Trail Leading Back to the Wuhan Labs

It is understandable that many would be wary of the notion that the origin of the coronavirus could be discovered by some documentary filmmaker who used to live in China. Matthew Tye, who creates YouTube videos, contends he has identified the source of the coronavirus — and a great deal of the information that ... Read More
World

How to Make China Pay

One of the big questions facing the international community today is how to hold China legally and politically accountable for all its dishonesty and harm to people around the world. According to reports, U.S. intelligence agencies have confirmed to the White House that China has deliberately understated the ... Read More
World

How to Make China Pay

One of the big questions facing the international community today is how to hold China legally and politically accountable for all its dishonesty and harm to people around the world. According to reports, U.S. intelligence agencies have confirmed to the White House that China has deliberately understated the ... Read More
World

All Signs Point to China

Just one big story today: collecting and sorting through what we know about the coronavirus's origins, and what makes sense and what doesn’t in the theory that it originated from someone eating bats or pangolins from the Huanan Seafood Market. What We Know and What We Don’t Know about the Source of ... Read More
World

All Signs Point to China

Just one big story today: collecting and sorting through what we know about the coronavirus's origins, and what makes sense and what doesn’t in the theory that it originated from someone eating bats or pangolins from the Huanan Seafood Market. What We Know and What We Don’t Know about the Source of ... Read More