Politics & Policy

March for Science: Sympathy for Our Enemies

Aerial footage of MOAB detonation in Afghanistan, April 14, 2017. (Photo: Department of Defense)
A group of purported science lovers frets about the harm ‘weaponized’ technology inflicts on ISIS.

As liberals tripped over each other virtue-signaling after the MOAB strike in Afghanistan on April 13 and imagining all the ways the erroneous but oft-cited figure of its $314 million cost could have been better spent (clean water! the homeless! health care!), one group really stood out amid the predictable morass: March for Science not only apologized on behalf of the science used to build the bomb, but it actually referred to ISIS terrorists as victims.

March for Science is purportedly a group of scientists and science-lovers who are organizing a worldwide march on April 22. Though the event is disguised as a rally for all things sciency, it is in reality intended to be a massive protest against President Trump, Republicans, and climate-change “deniers.” Its Twitter page has nearly 350,000 followers, and its website mentions “diversity” and “inclusion” repeatedly while saying nothing about specific scientific issues. It has come under fire from some within the scientific establishment for being too divisive and overly obsessed with identity politics, and for excluding scientists who might not toe the Democratic-party line.

In a tweetstorm the day a massive bomb wiped out several dozen ISIS terrorists, March for Science again exposed itself for the political, unscientific outfit it really is. It first posted a self-flagellating excerpt from its “Diversity Principles” statement, admitting that science has been used to “harm and oppress marginalized communities.”

But that was just a set-up for what was coming next:

So according to the scientists running the March for Science twitter page, terrorists who burn people alive, hack off their heads, and gang rape adolescent girls are “marginalized.” If only there had been some after-school arts programs or midnight-basketball leagues in Kabul, perhaps we could have avoided the murderous, torturous, indiscriminate rampage ISIS and other jihadists have inflicted on us for the better part of two decades. March for Science laments the “irreparable harm” inflicted by the MOAB. And golly, if only we make love not bombs, the feckless bureaucrats in Flint, Mich., could’ve fixed their water system!

In this logic, the U.S. can spend money either to cause “irreparable harm” to ISIS or to help Flint residents. It’s a zero-sum game that envisions a kind of moral equivalence between the two activities.

I scanned the March for Science’s timeline and — shocker! — there was no apology for the scientists who helped invent the internal combustion engine used in large trucks driven by maniacal murderers who plow into innocent people celebrating a Christmas festival or shopping in Stockholm or sightseeing in London. No hand-wringing about the science used to make suitcase bombs or backpack bombs that blow off the limbs of people waiting at an airport or a marathon finish line.

That wasn’t the end of it. March for Science had to weigh in on Sean Spicer’s comments earlier that week, in which he said that even Hitler “didn’t gas his own people that way Assad is doing” (comments for which Spicer later apologized):

It took only a moment to scroll back to the week when Syria’s president, Bashir al-Assad, attacked his own people with chemical weapons. Surely March for Science’s Twitter author anguished at science’s role in poisoning children and babies, right? Nope. Nothing. Why make Assad the bad guy when you have Sean Spicer?

After some people on social media (myself included) pushed back at their ludicrous tweets, March for Science deleted most of them. But hey: Thanks, science! Because of the scientific technology that created screen shots, a tweet never really dies.

It’s one thing for a hardcore leftist to start calculating how many “free” school lunches we can buy with the cost of one bomb — nothing new there. It’s another to have sympathy for jihadists and fret over the damage we inflict on terrorists. In the “woke” worldview, Trump is the true evildoer who deserves outrage and protest. And these are the same folks who insist we bow down to their “consensus” on man-made climate change and demonize us if we don’t. March for Science folks should worry less about the “irreparable harm” to a cave full of terrorists and more about the harm they’re inflicting on their own credibility.

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