Elections

Sex and the City Star Announces New York Gubernatorial Run

Cynthia Nixon accepts a Tony Award, June 11, 2017. (Carlo Allegri/Reuters)

Actress Cynthia Nixon, widely known for playing Miranda Hobbs on HBO’s Sex and the City, announced Monday that she will run for governor of New York.

Nixon, who has previously said she was considering launching a primary challenge to New York governor Andrew Cuomo, officially announced her bid by tweeting a campaign ad, which touched on economic inequality, health care, and New York’s much-maligned public-transportation system.

The self-described “progressive advocate,” opened the ad by declaring “I love New York,” before detailing her concerns regarding the state’s current political leadership.

“I was given chances I just don’t see for most of New York’s kids today. Our leaders are letting us down. We are now the most unequal state in the entire country, with both incredible wealth and extreme poverty.”

In early March — just one day after reports emerged indicating Nixon was consulting with Democratic strategists about entering the race — Cuomo dismissed her as a “second-tier celebrity,” and hinted that her long-time friend, New York mayor Bill de Blasio (a notable Cuomo antagonist) had encouraged her run.

“Normally name recognition is relevant when it has some connection to the endeavor,” Cuomo said during a conference call with reporters. “But if it’s just about name recognition, then I’m hoping that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie and Billy Joel don’t get into the race because if it’s just about name recognition, that would really be a problem.”

Nixon has pursued a career as an education activist following her years as an actress and campaigned aggressively for de Blasio in 2013. Cuomo and de Blasio have publicly feuded over a number of issues throughout their respective terms.

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

Demagoguery Is Not Leadership

The government of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in New Zealand has, with the support of the opposition, decided to enact fundamental changes in the nation’s firearms laws less than a week after the massacre at two Christchurch mosques. This is the opposite of leadership. It is also an example of why ... Read More
White House

The Media’s Disgrace

There will soon enough be an effort to memory-hole it, but the media coverage of the Russia investigation was abysmal and self-discrediting — obsessive and hysterical, often suggesting that the smoking gun was right around the corner, sometimes supporting its hoped-for result with erroneous, too-good-to-check ... Read More
Politics & Policy

What Was Trump So Annoyed About?

One of the stranger arguments that I heard throughout the Mueller saga -- and am hearing today, now that it's turned out to be a dud -- is that Donald Trump's irritation with the process was unreasonable and counterproductive. This tweet, from CNN's Chris Cilizza, is a nice illustration of the genre: Donald ... Read More
White House

Our Long National Hysteria 

Our long national hysteria may not be over, but at least it should — by rights — be diminished. Robert Mueller delivered his long-awaited report on Friday, and Attorney General William Barr just released his summary of the findings. They completely vindicate President Trump regarding the allegation that ... Read More