Politics & Policy

School Walkout Organizers Can’t Decide What They’re Protesting

Students carry signs during a protest for stricter gun control in Washington, D.C., March 14, 2018. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

The organization that coordinated Wednesday’s national school walkout, which was ostensibly a protest for stricter gun-control laws, has cited a number of other political causes as a justification for the mass demonstration.

The protest was organized not simply to advocate for stricter gun-control laws but also to speak out against “police brutality,” “militarized policing,” and America’s “imperialist foreign policy,” according to ENOUGH National School Walkout — a subsidiary of the Women’s March.

“It is important that when we refer to gun violence, we do not overlook the impact of police brutality and militarized policing, or see police in schools as a solution,” the group’s website reads under the banner “Why are we doing this.”

“We also recognize the United States has exported gun violence through imperialist foreign policy to destabilize other nations. We raise our voices for action against all these forms of gun violence.”

More than 3,000 schools across the country participated in the demonstration, according to the organizers.

The protests took on various forms as students in Times Square opted to remain silent while others outside the White House shouted and carried signs, which represented the amalgamation of disparate political causes they were apparently there to represent.

A student protest outside the Capitol building, which was well attended by prominent Democratic lawmakers, featured speakers discussing racial injustice, immigration policy, and gay rights.

Jack Crowe — Jack Crowe is a news writer at National Review Online.

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