Law & the Courts

The Democrats’ Hypocrisy on Violence against Women

Keith Ellison addresses the audience as the Democratic National Committee holds an election to choose their next chairperson at their winter meeting in Atlanta, Ga., February 25, 2017. (Chris Berry/Reuters)
They scream about Haven Monahans who don’t exist while ignoring Karen Monahans who do.

While there are many unknowns surrounding the current accusations against Judge Kavanaugh, one thing that is perfectly clear is the rank hypocrisy of the Democratic party.

The Democrats, after all, are the party that extolled serial sexual predators such as Ted Kennedy, who attempted to cover up his causing a woman’s death during one of his drunken escapades. When Kennedy died less than a decade ago, the media referred to him as “The Lion of the Senate,” and he received a televised multi-hour funeral procession and hagiography that was carried live on several networks.

But Kennedy was a piker compared with Bill Clinton, who not only took sexual advantage of a White House intern while president but was accused of sexual assault by multiple women with far more evidence than has been presented against Judge Kavanaugh. Democrats responded by nominating his wife, who’d worked to destroy the credibility of his accusers, to run for president on an overtly feminist platform. “You have a right to be believed,” Hillary told victims of sexual assault.

Then there are the tales of two Monahans.

The first is Karen Monahan — she’s been in the news recently because both she and her son accused Congressman Keith Ellison, deputy chairman of the Democratic National Committee, of violently assaulting her.

Monahan, an active Democrat, and her son seemingly have no motive to lie about Ellison’s behavior, and three friends of Monahan and her work supervisor also said she confided Ellison’s abuse to them at the time it is alleged to have happened. She has provided medical records showing that she discussed the alleged abuse (and her fear of retribution from Ellison, who is named in the medical record) with her physician and her work supervisor.

While there must always be a presumption of innocence of any person accused of serious crimes, Ellison’s denials are mitigated by the subsequent emergence of a second highly credible claim of assault against him. This claim, backed up by a contemporary 911 call specifically identifies Ellison as the perpetrator of ongoing domestic violence.

Despite knowing of the allegations, the Minnesota Democrats endorsed Ellison for the office of attorney general, giving him over 82 percent at their recent convention. As attorney general, he’d be responsible for enforcing domestic-violence and rape laws.

Compare the Democrats’ treatment of Karen Monahan, who tweeted that she had been “smeared, threatened and isolated from my own party,” with their treatment of another incident involving a Monahan. “Haven Monahan” was a central figure in the Rolling Stone story about an alleged gang rape that roiled the University of Virginia in 2014, one that turned out to be a hoax.

Haven Monahan, according to Rolling Stone, gave “instruction and encouragement” to the seven men who gang-raped a woman at a UVA frat party. Monahan turned out to be a figment of the fertile imagination of Jackie Coakley, the UVA student who concocted an elaborately fraudulent and premeditated tale of rape.

Coakley’s lies, apparently motivated by her desire to get the romantic attention of a fellow student, led to threats of violence against innocent members of the fraternity she slandered and a total ban on Greek life at the university for a substantial period of time. It also led to more calls from Democrats for a “national discussion” about the “campus rape epidemic.” “The wrongs described in Rolling Stone are appalling and have caused all of us to reexamine our responsibility to this community,” UVA’s president said at the time.

The Democrats are always eager to exploit these claims for political gain. In 2016, Hillary Clinton’s campaign site was still posting the false claim that one in five women on campus would be victims of sexual assault. According to a recent Bureau of Justice Statistics report, the number of women experiencing sexual assault in four years of college is closer to to 2.4 percent, with just 0.8 percent being victims of rape — numbers that are still far too high but a far cry from those put out by Democrat politicians and feminist groups.

Yet even as her story unraveled, Coakley was not chargd with a crime or even held accountable by the university for honor-code violations. Long after Coakley’s lies were apparent, prominent feminists were still defending her. Jessica Valenti wrote:

I choose to believe Jackie. I lose nothing by doing so even if I’m proven wrong. But at least I will be able to sleep at night for having stood by a young woman who may have been through an awful trauma.

In Valenti’s world, the trauma of men falsely accused of rape doesn’t exist.

Today, we see Valentiism in the Democrats’ response to Kavanaugh. For noted feminist writer Ana Marie Cox, “we need to judge Brett Kavanaugh, not just by what he may or may not have done, but how he treats a woman’s pain.” Senator Maize Hirono of Hawaii was even more blunt, saying, “I just want to say to the men in this country: Shut up and step up.”

But Michelle Malkin had it right: “Rape is a devastating crime. So is lying about it. It’s not victim blaming to get to the bottom of the truth. It’s liar-shaming. Don’t believe a gender. Believe evidence.”

A prediction: Eventually, the Democrats will have to abandon Keith Ellison. As vice chairman of the party and candidate for Minnesota AG, he’s important but not necessary. His career is nowhere near as important to them as keeping Kavanaugh off the Supreme Court is. And even for the hypocritical mainstream media, it’s not politically tenable to play up ancient charges against a high-school Kavanaugh with no direct evidence while ignoring highly substantiated charges against Ellison that occurred while he was a sitting congressman.

Politically and substantively, this should be he bottom line for the GOP on Judge Kavanaugh: Extraordinary claims made with extraordinary timing and having extraordinary consequences require extraordinary evidence. And that’s not what we have here, not even close. Barring an absolutely stunning near-term revelation of new facts, Republicans should move to confirm Judge Kavanaugh on schedule and without apology.

Because we are not God, none of us can truly know who Judge Kavanaugh and Professor Ford are. But we do know what the Democratic party is on issues of violence and sexual assault against women.

They’re the party that screams about Haven Monahans who don’t exist while ignoring Karen Monahans who do. And for decades, continuing to this very day, they inveigh against the GOP’s alleged  “war on women” while they cover for the own abusers in the highest places, at times inventing nonexistent rapists and fake sexual-assault statistics when it serves their political interests.

Does that make you absolutely furious?

Me Too.

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