Rethinking President Grant (Part Two)

General Ulysses S. Grant during the Civil War at his headquarters in Cold Harbor, Va., June 1864 (Library of Congress)
Examining his record on the economy, corruption, foreign policy, and the treatment of religious and ethnic minorities

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE I n Part One of this essay, I looked at why the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant received so little historical respect for so long, and why his record on Reconstruction — the defining issue of his time in office (1869–1876) — deserves to be honored, even though many of his accomplishments in that area failed to endure beyond his presidency.

As with any president, however, Grant had a lot else on his plate. Today, I’ll look at Grant’s record in three other areas: the economy and corruption, foreign policy, and the treatment of Native Americans and religious minorities.

The Gilded Age: President

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