National Popular Vote Movement Tries to Win Over Skeptical Conservatives

Voters at a polling place in Columbus, Ohio, in 2012 (Matt Sullivan/Reuters)
As the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact inches closer to changing how we elect the president, supporters still must sway right-leaning voters to their cause.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE L ast week, Oregon’s Democratic governor, Kate Brown, committed her state to an interstate compact designed to ensure that the national popular vote determines presidential elections. By signing the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), Brown is aligning herself squarely with fellow Democrats who believe that a plurality of voters nationwide should elect the president.

Their efforts, while long predating President Trump’s election, gained new urgency in its wake. The Electoral College, many Democrats claimed, subverted the will of the electorate in 2016. After all, 3.5 million more votes were cast for Hillary Clinton than for Trump, yet she was forced to

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