A Family Quarrel

(Unsplash)
A new proposal for supporting families is inferior to building on the successful policies we already have.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE T he federal government imposes too heavy a tax burden on parents, and particularly on parents of large families. It ought to reduce that burden by expanding the child tax credit: enlarging it from its current value of $2,000 per child to at least $4,500; applying it fully against payroll and income taxes; indexing it to grow along with wages; and making these changes part of permanent law. For decades, Americans have had fewer children than they indicate to social scientists that they would like. An enlarged child credit would make it more possible for them to reach their goals.

So I

Something to Consider

If you enjoyed this article, we have a proposition for you: Join NRPLUS. Members get all of our content (including the magazine), no paywalls or content meters, an advertising-minimal experience, and unique access to our writers and editors (through conference calls, social media groups, and more). And importantly, NRPLUS members help keep NR going.

If you enjoyed this article and want to see more content like this, we have a proposition for you: Join NRPLUS.

 

Join Now
Ramesh Ponnuru is a senior editor for National Review, a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and a senior fellow at the National Review Institute.

Recommended

The Latest