Why We Love Leonardo

Left: The Virgin and Child with Saint John the Baptist and an Angel, known as the Virgin of the Rocks, c. 1483-1494, by Leonardo da Vinci. Oil on panel, transferred to canvas. (Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, INV. 777 © RMN- Grand Palais (musée du Louvre)/Michel Urtado)
Right: Saint John the Baptist, c. 1508-1519, by Leonardo da Vinci. Oil on walnut panel. (Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, INV. 775 © RMN- Grand Palais (musée du Louvre)/Michel Urtado)
A new show at the Louvre sheds light on the ravishing work of the original Renaissance man.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE T he Louvre’s retrospective of the career of Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) addresses what might seem an odd question but isn’t. Why was he the most famous and esteemed artist of his age and every age since his death 500 years ago?

The Last Supper rocked the art world in 1498 when Leonardo painted it on the wall of a convent dining hall in Milan. His conception was both revolutionary and instantly acclaimed, shocking since the convent was an obscure site, and he worked long before the age of mass dissemination of images. He fashioned himself as a scientist, but his bungled

Recommended

The Latest