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Here’s the Thing: Support National Review

A man in a surgical mask walks by an illuminated American flag in Manhattan, March 13, 2020. (Andrew Kelly/Reuters)
At times like these, we need its nuanced, independent voice even more.

Let me interrupt the National Review webathon to say . . .

Hey there.

Times are tough, right?

For one thing, the world is melting down. For another, we’re trapped in our homes — in some cases alone, with nothing but our own racing, catastrophizing thoughts to keep us company in crisis.

Although we Americans have gotten through many tragedies before, what seems to be different this time around is the fact that we’re so polarized. It’s sad, but true: Apparently, not even a deadly virus can unite us, and it seems that far too many people are more interested in playing politics with this situation than they are in objective truth.

That’s where National Review comes in. See, as my boss, Rich Lowry, pointed out last week, National Review publishes writers who have differing opinions on various issues, including this one — the one commonality, though, is that “our analysis has always been based on fact and reason.”

See, at National Review, nuance is welcome. While the rest of the world, for example, is either lauding hydroxychloroquine as medicine’s greatest miracle or slamming it as life-endangering quackery, we have Jim Geraghty calling out the stupidity of viewing such a complicated, uncertain topic as if it were black-and-white.

Last week, when President Trump brought Mike Lindell — better known as “That MyPillow Guy” — to speak at his press conference and announce that he’d be using his resources to make masks, most of the media focused on ridiculing parts of his comments, while they completely ignored that his efforts could save lives. Personally? I wrote a piece expressing, again, the possibility of nuance: Yes, the MyPillow Guy is a dork, and yes, I also could have done without him saying that President Trump is a gift from God Himself, but it is ludicrous to criticize Lindell’s comments without celebrating the critical help that he and other private businesses are providing.

If you, like me, appreciate National Review for its nuanced, thoughtful approach to the news, I’d encourage you to support our current effort. Whatever amount you can afford, large or small, will help us to continue providing a voice for reason in a sea of sycophancy.

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