Terrified of Light: The Depressing Argument for Crippling Our Space Program

NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station, June 14, 2018. (NASA)
In his book Dark Skies, political scientist Daniel Deudney defends the thesis that human safety requires the preservation of ignorance.

Large-scale space expansion must be viewed as something akin to a full-scale nuclear war and assiduously avoided. . . . Learning to live on Earth in ways consistent with the continued viability of the biosphere clearly requires an acceptance of limits.

— Daniel Deudney

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE N o human society has ever failed because it was too technologically advanced or possessed too much scientific knowledge. Many, however, have suffered catastrophe because of deficiencies in those areas. Even so, there has been no shortage of writers willing to defend the counterfactual thesis that human safety requires the preservation of ignorance. With his book, Dark Skies, Johns Hopkins professor

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