NR Webathon

We Won’t Be Canceled

National Review founder William F. Buckley Jr.
With your help, we’re a fortified island of sanity in a sea of woke tyranny.

If you’ll forgive me, I think if you haven’t realized the importance of National Review more than ever the last few months, you haven’t been paying attention.

At a time of insanity, we are committed to reason.

At a time of superstition, we believe in the facts.

At a time when right-wing — or even moderate or even just plain sensible — views are being squeezed out of the debate, we are unapologetically and fearlessly conservative.

That’s why I’m asking you to please consider giving to our summer webathon.

If we’ve learned anything over the past few months of cancellings, shamings, and forced apologies, it is that tending to those few places that are committed to telling the truth is absolutely essential.

My colleague John O’Sullivan long ago came up with “O’Sullivan’s law,” which is that any organization that isn’t explicitly conservative becomes progressive over time.

Our current cultural revolution requires an updating of this law: Any organization that isn’t explicitly conservative becomes absolutely bonkers in an instant.

It’s not just the New York Times or the San Francisco Museum of Modern art. It’s schools and businesses and other institutions — places Americans tend to trust — that have suddenly become merciless woke enforcers dropping the hammer on unsuspecting employees.

It turns out that much of American life is subject to intimidation and group-think. We’re seeing illiberal, unfair, and un-American acts every single day.

It’s not just that National Review pushes back against this frenzied, self-imposed despotism; we represent a fortified island that stands apart from the dominant culture.

We are built, with your help, to resist pressure to get with the woke program.

We have advertisers, and we are grateful for them, but that’s not our main source of revenue.

We don’t do fancy events with banks and credit-card companies as sponsors.

We don’t have corporate donors to speak of.

We aren’t owned by a billionaire susceptible to the social pressures of his or her friends.

No, basically all we’ve got is you: subscribers and friends who are devoted to American principles and to right reason, who are always there for us, and who are never going to get scared away by woke mobs.

You are what makes our home base so secure, and we are asking you to do it again and help us meet our $250,00 webathon goal.

We don’t just write about what are supposed to be taboo subjects, such as the lunatic excesses of transgender activists; we don’t just gladly publish the best canceled writer in America, one Kevin D. Williamson; we don’t just puncture the absurd pieties that characterize our age. We do it with zest, wit, and intelligence — while welcoming, indeed, enjoying, robust internal debate.

This combination has always been rare, and it seems to be getting rarer by the hour.

If you think there should be at least a corner of our journalistic and intellectual life that operates this way, and if you have been alarmed at the sound of the American mind slamming shut at so many institutions recently, please lend us your support.

It goes to the writers and editors who make this publication what it is, and who send rhetorical and intellectual artillery shells over into enemy lines every day, and every hour.

It should be self-evident that we need NR now more than ever.

That’s why I’m asking you to chip in whatever you can, from $5,000 to $5.

This is our mutual cause and we are never going to abandon it. Thanks so much for reading — and for doing whatever you can to keep us uncancellable.

Most Popular

The Arson Party

About that peaceful transfer of power . . . I do not have access to my friend Mario Loyola’s Donald J. Trump super-secret decoder ring, but I am inclined to accept Loyola’s explanation that what President Trump was trying to say, but couldn’t quite manage to say, was the usual witless Trump trolling -- ... Read More

The Arson Party

About that peaceful transfer of power . . . I do not have access to my friend Mario Loyola’s Donald J. Trump super-secret decoder ring, but I am inclined to accept Loyola’s explanation that what President Trump was trying to say, but couldn’t quite manage to say, was the usual witless Trump trolling -- ... Read More
Education

Husband of Sen. Dianne Feinstein Admits to Helping Well-Connected Applicants Gain Admission to University of California: ‘No One Ever Told Me It Was Wrong’

The husband of Senator Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) admitted on Thursday to sending an inappropriate letter identified in a state audit that appeared to help an applicant to the University of California, Berkeley, get accepted to the school. The California State Auditor issued a scathing report on Tuesday ... Read More
Education

Husband of Sen. Dianne Feinstein Admits to Helping Well-Connected Applicants Gain Admission to University of California: ‘No One Ever Told Me It Was Wrong’

The husband of Senator Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) admitted on Thursday to sending an inappropriate letter identified in a state audit that appeared to help an applicant to the University of California, Berkeley, get accepted to the school. The California State Auditor issued a scathing report on Tuesday ... Read More
Law & the Courts

No, the Democrats Won’t Pack the Court

For many progressive opinion-makers, the only way to save the Supreme Court is to destroy it.   They believe the best response to the Republican-held Senate confirming a Trump nominee to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court is to pack the Court if Democrats win in November. Holding out the ... Read More
Law & the Courts

No, the Democrats Won’t Pack the Court

For many progressive opinion-makers, the only way to save the Supreme Court is to destroy it.   They believe the best response to the Republican-held Senate confirming a Trump nominee to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court is to pack the Court if Democrats win in November. Holding out the ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Do You Want 51 or 52 States Next Year?

“The prospects of statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., have never been greater, but many significant obstacles loom,” The Hill declares. The Constitution declares, “new States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Do You Want 51 or 52 States Next Year?

“The prospects of statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., have never been greater, but many significant obstacles loom,” The Hill declares. The Constitution declares, “new States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction ... Read More
Education

Bring Civics Back to the Classroom

Margaret Thatcher once said, “European nations were made by history. The United States was made by philosophy. Unique among all nations, the United States knows precisely when and exactly why it was founded.” Today, that may be changing. Survey after survey shows that Americans have a dismally poor ... Read More
Education

Bring Civics Back to the Classroom

Margaret Thatcher once said, “European nations were made by history. The United States was made by philosophy. Unique among all nations, the United States knows precisely when and exactly why it was founded.” Today, that may be changing. Survey after survey shows that Americans have a dismally poor ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Limited Judgement

On the menu today: a long look at whether the country would be better off if Supreme Court justices were limited to 18 years on the highest court, a new survey shows the public turning away from the protesters, and a tweet from the New York Times reveals some remarkable skepticism. Does the Supreme Court Need ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Limited Judgement

On the menu today: a long look at whether the country would be better off if Supreme Court justices were limited to 18 years on the highest court, a new survey shows the public turning away from the protesters, and a tweet from the New York Times reveals some remarkable skepticism. Does the Supreme Court Need ... Read More