An Election Day Bridge Too Far

Empty ballot boxes at the Allegheny County Election Warehouse in Pittsburgh, Pa., November 6, 2020. (John Altdorfer/Reuters)
Voters might not have had concerns about irregularities, if fundamental steps were taken, and problems fixed.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE N o wonder half the public is concerned about irregularities in the 2020 voting.

No wonder they would support Donald Trump’s skepticism, once a reputable legal team quickly, publicly, and transparently presents to the nation justified concerns about constitutional violations in changing state voting laws and documented accounts of computer glitches, inexplicable late arrivals of ballot troves, and systemic efforts to prevent transparency — all at a level that reasonably could question the authenticity of the final vote count or even serve a dire warning of things to come.

Voting sanctity was not just questioned by Trump. It became a recent issue in

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