Chauvin Murder Trial: The Prosecution’s Reckless Gambit

Courtroom sketch of Sergeant Jody Stiger of the Los Angeles Police Department answers questions during the trial of Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis, Minn., April 6, 2021. (Jane Rosenberg/Reuters)
To suggest that counterfeiting is not a serious crime opens the door to an array of complications.

NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE O n Tuesday afternoon, in the Derek Chauvin murder trial, the state called a use-of-force expert from out of town, Sergeant Jody Stiger of the Los Angeles Police Department, to opine that the former police officer used excessive force in applying a neck hold that, he believes, caused the death of George Floyd.

I’ll have more to say in a separate post about the state’s case and the effort by Chauvin’s counsel to dismantle it. For now, let’s turn to the prosecution’s suggestion that counterfeiting is not a serious offense, and therefore that the method of detaining Floyd was necessarily excessive since,

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