Jesse Saffron

Jesse Saffron is a writer and editor for the John W. Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, a North Carolina-based think tank dedicated to improving higher education in the Tar ...

Jesse Saffron is a writer and editor for the John W. Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, a North Carolina-based think tank dedicated to improving higher education in the Tar Heel State and across the country. Among other topics, Saffron writes about University of North Carolina system governance, the financials of America’s public and private colleges, and free speech on campus. 

Saffron is a graduate of the University of Baltimore School of Law and the College of Charleston, where he studied economics. Saffron has also studied at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. 

In addition to writing articles and editing website content, Saffron manages the Pope Center’s summer internship program and is a frequent contributor to National Review Online’s higher education blog, Phi Beta Cons. Saffron plays guitar, hikes, and watches basketball during his leisure time. 

The Latest

“Merit Aid” and the Unending Pursuit of Prestige

Today’s rankings-centric colleges and universities have fallen in love with “merit aid.” By reducing tuition sticker prices for top applicants, institutions can entice those who otherwise would have attended a more prestigious university and keep faculty, who ...

First World Problems on Campus

It’s time to break out the tissue paper, because tears of sympathy will flow after you learn about what Duke University students have to endure. Sure, they may have the resources to ...

Establishment Writers Have an Epiphany

It’s not often that those outside of higher education reform circles question the establishment line that the country needs more college graduates. “College for All” seems to be the mantra ...

When Students Fall Through the Cracks

Some students, on the surface at least, seem to do well in today’s K-12 environment, which increasingly is marked by standardized testing and incessant grading. Such academic competition starts early and is reinforced by ...

Free Lunch for College Students!

Well, the lunches wouldn’t exactly be “free.” They would cost taxpayers billions. And there’s no hard evidence that large swaths of college students are actually going hungry. But it’s still a good idea, right?  According to ...

Well, That Escalated Quickly…

“A tenured professor of political science [at Marquette University], John McAdams, was barred from campus, suspended from teaching, threatened with termination, and told that he could only return if he ...

Rhinestones Masquerading as Diamonds

In this week’s Pope Center Clarion Call, George Leef explains why grade inflation is such a pernicious force in higher education. The reasons for the increasingly easy “A” are based on the self-interest of ...

UT’s Diversity Office Creates Discord

Campus diversity offices, especially those at flagship universities, are often staffed with well-paid administrators who promote progressive causes in the name of “inclusivity.” But rather than foster peace and understanding among ...

How You Can Make Colleges Better

Higher education is a multi-billion-dollar industry that employs hundreds of thousands of administrators, professors, and other professionals across the country. It affects our national, state, and local political scenes. And, of ...