Bench Memos

Law & the Courts

Congratulations to Sarah Hawkins Warren

Congratulations to Sarah Hawkins Warren on her appointment to the Supreme Court of Georgia.   Warren is filling the vacancy resulting from Judge Britt Grant’s confirmation to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit last month.

Warren, 36, most recently served as the Solicitor General in the Office of the Attorney General for Georgia. Prior to that, Warren was Deputy Solicitor General of Georgia and a Special Counsel for Water Litigation in the Attorney General’s office.  She has held numerous leadership positions in The Federalist Society over the course of her career, and is a frequent panelist and speaker for Federalist Society events.

I expect Warren to continue to serve the State of Georgia well in her newest capacity as a justice, and commend Governor Nathan Deal for making an outstanding appointment.

Carrie Severino is chief counsel and policy director to the Judicial Crisis Network.

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