Bench Memos

Law & the Courts

This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism—August 13

(Photo Illustration: NRO)

2015—In State v. Santiago, the Connecticut supreme court rules by a 4-3 vote that the death penalty “as currently applied” violates the state constitution. (Under some quirk of Connecticut procedure, the “official release” date of the ruling is August 25.)

The majority relies heavily on the fact that the Connecticut legislature prospectively repealed the death penalty in 2012. It thus effectively expands the legislature’s prospective-only repeal into a retroactive repeal of the death penalty for the twelve convicts who were sentenced to death for crimes committed before the 2012 enactment.

The court’s ruling ought to make it more difficult for other legislatures to repeal the death penalty prospectively. Any such purported prospective-only repeal will now be known to present a huge risk that a state court will determine that the death penalty cannot be applied at all. And the specific heinous criminals who will benefit from that abolition will be easy for legislators and their constituents to identify, as the last several pages of associate justice Carmen Espinosa’s powerful dissent make clear.

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