The Corner

Up Against the Walt

Yesterday, I attempted to debunk Stephen Walt’s latest bit of sophistry and propaganda. Today, David Frum takes Walt on from a somewhat different perspective, noting in part:

Even by its own premises this argument is a bust. I have little doubt the approval of the United States in Germany and Japan was higher in 1960 than in 1939. In the interim we had killed hundreds of thousands of Germans and Japanese. The difference was regime change and a change in the population’s tolerance for tyranny. Mr. Walt might take a lesson.

Worth reading the whole piece.

Clifford D. May — Clifford D. May is an American journalist and editor. He is the president of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a conservative policy institute created shortly after the 9/11 attacks, ...

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