The Donald and the Draft

On Tuesday, Greg Kelly, co-host of Good Day New York, queried Donald Trump about his experience during the Vietnam War. “You were 22 years old in the summer of 1968,” Kelly began. “Somehow, you avoided the draft. I want to know how you avoided it and why.”

“Well, I actually got lucky because I had a very high draft number,” Trump replied. “I was sitting at college, watching. I was going to the Wharton School of Finance. And I was watching as they did the draft numbers and I got a very, very high number and those numbers [they] never got up to.”

But in her biography of Trump, Donald Trump: Master Apprentice, journalist Gwenda Blair attributes the Donald’s escape of the draft to another factor: “Donald’s military career ended with NYMA graduation; despite his athletic prowess, in 1968 he received a medical deferment from the military draft.”

I’m just asking questions. (Hat tip: The Presidential Candidates)

UPDATE: Our commenters beat me to it, but the Selective Service System’s website says the first lottery drawing was December 1, 1969 — a year after Trump had graduated from Wharton. That drawing “determined the order of call for induction during calendar year 1970; that is, for registrants born between January 1, 1944, and December 31, 1950.” According to this chart, Trump’s number was 356 (his birthday was June 14, 1946).

Most Popular

Elections

Romney Is a Misfit for America

Mitt’s back. The former governor of Massachusetts and occasional native son of Michigan has a new persona: Mr. Utah. He’s going to bring Utah conservatism to the whole Republican party and to the country at large. Wholesome, efficient, industrious, faithful. “Utah has a lot to teach the politicians in ... Read More
U.S.

Fire the FBI Chief

American government is supposed to look and sound like George Washington. What it actually looks and sounds like is Henry Hill from Goodfellas: bad suit, hand out, intoning the eternal mantra: “F*** you, pay me.” American government mostly works by interposition, standing between us, the free people at ... Read More
Film & TV

Black Panther’s Circle of Hype

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) first infantilizes its audience, then banalizes it, and, finally, controls it through marketing. This commercial strategy, geared toward adolescents of all ages, resembles the Democratic party’s political manipulation of black Americans, targeting that audience through its ... Read More