The Corner

Politics & Policy

Hillary Clinton, Prepared for Failure

(Via YouTube)

There isn’t very much that’s interesting about the Hillary Rodham Clinton e-mail revelation—that she never had a government account, that she used a private e-mail service for official communication, that she thereby exposed the national diplomatic mission to malevolent intelligence operations and cybercriminals, etc. Of course she did. She’s a Clinton, and the Clintons are in it for themselves.

What is interesting is the Washington Post’s report that she apparently used an account that she established the day the Senate began confirmation hearings for her appointment as secretary of state. She’s a Clinton, and Clintons cannot be faulted for failing to think in advance.

Theories are proliferating about why she would do that—what did/does she have to hide?

Here’s my theory: She was preparing for failure.

Mrs. Clinton knows – she must know, at some level – that she has been grossly unprepared for every position she has held in public life other than that of first lady. She was a New York senator who knew the parts of the state more than 40 miles from a park-view room at the Plaza about as well as Robert F. Kennedy Jr. knows Muleshoe, Texas. She was a presidential candidate whose only recommendations were ovaries and a surname beloved – but not quite enough — by Democratic primary voters. And then she became a secretary of state appointed to the position mainly to appease the bruised feelings of Clintonites and to keep her from making mischief in case of a first-term Obama administration meltdown.

But she was a grossly incompetent secretary of state who knew that she was going to run for president again, and thus she took positive steps in advance to put in place protocols that would help her to mask her inadequacy. It is difficult even for her admirers to make a credible argument that her time in that office was anything other than disastrous. She knows this.

The news media and the Democrats know this, too. Mrs. Clinton’s career in public office has been nothing more than a tribute to her husband, a fact that you would think would rankle the feminists who are so enthused about the former first lady’s presidential ambitions. Maybe it’s time to take off the presidential kneepads and admit what everybody knows: She isn’t very good at this sort of thing, and promoting her to her next level of incompetence is an invitation to disaster.  

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