Jonathan Gruber’s Many Efforts to Deceive the American People

You may remember that one of the key minds behind Obamacare, MIT professor Jonathan Gruber, was pretty sure that Obamacare subsidies couldn’t be distributed unless it happened through a state exchange . . . until he wasn’t. (That legal theory will be put to the test soon since the Supreme Court has agreed on Friday to hear the challenge.)

Well, Gruber is back in the news today regarding an admission he made about the efforts that went into obscuring the nature of Obamacare in order to sell it to the American public:

Mr. Gruber clearly needs to be more careful about what he says, but he also doesn’t seem to understand the American people all that well: Even with the lack of information, the American people has never really liked the law, and they certainly became increasingly unfavorable as they experienced it firsthand.

As I wrote a few months ago, Gruber’s deception is nothing new:

This is also the same Gruber who said in January that Obamacare wasn’t designed to save money, even calling the idea that savings were a “misleading motivator” for Obamacare. This was after he very actively promoted the deficit-reducing side of the law before it was adopted and called Obamacare “a historic and cost-effective step in the right direction” toward saving our health-care cost problems. He’s also the guy whose work was used to create the appearance of a consensus among health economists about the ACA, without revealing that he was a paid contractor.

Veronique de Rugy — Veronique de Rugy is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Her primary research interests include the U.S. economy, the federal budget, homeland security, taxation, ...

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