McConnell’s Contingency Plan

It’s beginning to get out on the Hill. It’s complicated, but here is the gist as I understand it: Congress authorizes in legislation the president to submit a request for an increase in the debt limit in three tranches over the next year or so, with corresponding proposals for spending cuts; when the president submits his request, Congress immediately considers a resolution of disapproval; if the resolution passes, the president can veto it and–assuming his veto is subsequently upheld–he gets the increase in the debt limit. Got it? More later…

 

UPDATE

From the comments:

 Uncledave Wasn’t that a “Schoolhouse Rock” episode?

Tom in SFCA Why doesn’t the GOP simply “deem” the debt limit increase to have passed. That would make everything cool, wouldn’t it?

Rich Lowry — Rich Lowry is the editor of National Review. He can be reached via email: comments.lowry@nationalreview.com. 

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