Culture

The Corner

‘Nature’s Rights’ Constitutional Amendment Proposed

The California secession movement is active again, gathering signatures for a vote.

One group, perhaps knowing that won’t happen, is pushing for changes to the U.S. Constitution, including a new amendment guaranteeing the “Nature’s rights.” From the Mercury News story:

The U.S. Constitution, the group says, should include a section entitled “Human Community Laws of Nature.” It should “declare that Nature is a freely living being with inalienable rights and that no individual, business entity, government, `owner,’ or organization shall inflict violence or servitude on her,” according to a working document posted online.

Before you are tempted to laugh, realize that the environmental movement is becoming increasingly anti-human and the “nature rights” movement is growing.

Thus, while I am almost sure–almost–that the Constitution will never be so amended, it would not surprise me at all if California or some other state that leans heavily to the port side passes such a law.

Also note, that two countries have enacted nature rights, and that the meme was supported by former UN Secretary General, Ban Ki Moon.

Meanwhile, at least three rivers have been declared to be “persons” with enforceable rights, as well as two glaciers. 

Nearly 40 US municipalities, including Santa Monica. These laws allow anyone to seek a court order enforcing the “rights of nature” by impeding development.

Oh, and one orangutan was declared a non-human person in Argentina and granted a writ of habeas corpus. 

Nature rights seeks to prevent humans thriving from the use of natural resources. It is a form of nature religion. It is also an ideological statement against human exceptionalism that declares us just another species in the forest.

In essence, this is a war on humans. We ignore the peril of the nature rights movement at our own peril. 

Wesley J. Smith — Wesley J. Smith is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism.

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