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Trump: I ‘Always Felt That I Was in the Military’ Because of Boarding School

Yes, yes, comments section, NRO is full of Trump Derangement Syndrome, we’re all GOP Establishment wimps, we’re all in the tank for Jeb, yadda yadda yadda…

Because only a Georgetown salon-attending squish could possibly object to a candidate claiming that a military-themed boarding school is the equivalent of serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

You have to be a frothing-at-the-mouth Trump-hater to find the statement that boarding school attendees have “more training militarily than a lot of the guys that go into the military” is unhinged, and suggests an unnerving detachment from reality for a potential commander-in-chief.

Trump: I ‘Always Felt That I Was in the Military’ Because of Boarding School

This won’t bother Trump supporters. Nothing does.

Donald Trump, who received draft deferments through much of the Vietnam War, told the author of a forthcoming biography that he nevertheless “always felt that I was in the military” because of his education at a military-themed boarding school.

Mr. Trump said that his experience at the New York Military Academy, an expensive prep school where his parents had sent him to correct poor behavior, gave him “more training militarily than a lot of the guys that go into the military.” …

According to the book, Mr. Trump attended the New York Military Academy after years of rowdy and rebellious behavior at Kew-Forest, a more traditional prep school in Queens. Mr. Trump once recalled giving a teacher at Kew-Forest a black eye “because I didn’t think he knew anything about music.”

He arrived at the military academy — where tuition now reaches $31,000 a year — for eighth grade in 1959 and remained for high school. Like all students at the Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y., campus, he wore a uniform, participated in marching drills and was expected to conform to a hierarchy imposed by instructors, some of whom had served in the military.

The book also quotes Trump as saying, “For the most part, you can’t respect people because most people aren’t worthy of respect.”

Gee, that philosophy couldn’t be possibly be dangerous or a bad idea in a commander-in-chief, right? When you look back at the great presidents in American history, whichever ones you like – George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, FDR, Truman, Ike, Ronald Reagan – what comes shining through is that fundamental belief that most people aren’t worthy of respect, right?

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