The Corner

Will’s Take: Welcome to Indiana’s ‘Indignation Sweepstakes’

“There is nothing more tiresome in modern American life,” says columnist George Will, “than the indignation sweepstakes we get in all the time to see who can be most angry about this and that.” And the sweepstakes are on in Indiana.

Responding to the outrage surrounding the Hoosier State’s new Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Will noted on Tuesday’s Special Report, “Tim Cook, CEO of Apple thinks Indiana is a horrible place. He opened marketing and retailing operations in Saudi Arabia two months before a man was sentenced to 450 lashes for being gay. The selective indignation is itself wonderful.

“There are obviously two important principles at stake here,” Will continued. “One is, the government should rarely, and only with extreme difficulty, compel people to take actions contrary to their consciences. The other is that when you open your doors to commerce you open them to everybody. That’s a simple thing. It goes back to the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the public accommodations section, which is surely a great moment in American history. You can work this out, but the indignation isn’t helping.”

NR Staff — Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

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