Did the Secret Service Take Aim at Mr. Met?

According to a new book by the young man who inhabited the Mr. Met costume from 1994 to 1997, it nearly came to that:

 

 

[A. J.] Mass was angling to get a picture with Clinton on April 15, 1997 — the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s historic first major league game.

Accompanied by two female college interns, the costumed Mass set off in search of his presidential prey: “The holy grail for all mascots — a photo op and meet and greet with a sitting President,” he wrote.

His hopes were soon crushed by the Secret Service agent sporting a dark suit and a darker mood.

Mass recalled the agent started eyeballing him after Mr. Met’s head failed to fit through an on-field metal detector.

Alas, the article doesn’t indicate whether the “two female college interns” were able to spend quality time with President Clinton.

More here.

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