The Corner

Politics & Policy

Adopted? Spent Time in Foster Care? Adoptive Parent? Thinking about Fostering?

If any of these things describe you, please considering coming to our foster-care forum next Thursday in Washington, D.C. It’s immediately following the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast — to make it easier for people attending the breakfast, especially from out of town, to participate in the foster-care event. But is by no means for Catholics only — our speakers are ecumenical. And the goals are to raise awareness and highlight resources.

At a time when adoption and foster care tend to only be in the news when they are clash points on some of the most contentious “culture war” issues or because of some horrific incident, the agenda here is talk about what can be done to help more children and families well and quickly.

Foster-care and adoption is a little bit like the military — it’s a tremendous sacrifice for families and so few of us serve. So so many of us don’t even grasp the layers of issues involved. And at the same time families who do step up to the plate have some tremendous stories of hope to share — robust love stories that yes involve some incredible obstacles because of past traumas. And what about those children who are languishing in foster care? How to keep from adding to them, especially as we face the plague of opioid addiction?

Maybe especially if you’ve not given any of this thought, come to our forum. This is a conversation for everyone to be a part of.

Not everyone is called to foster-care and adoption but there’s a role for everyone in supporting solutions.

We’ll have more around these parts in the coming days. Meanwhile, please do consider coming if you’re around D.C. that day and please share this with people who might want to attend.

I’m struck by how grateful people who work in these fields are when we pay attention. Let’s pay attention more and do something. Start with sharing news of this forum so we can share more information and, I hope, be inspired to make a priority of supporting solutions and maybe be a solution ourselves. There are many models and many ways to help, as some of our speakers will be talking about.

RSVP for the National Review Institute’s foster-care forum on May 24th here. And please pass the fact that it’s happening along to someone who might be interested in attending. Thank you! Again, details are here.

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