The Corner

Farewell to Alexis Levinson (…But Not Quite Yet)

An early farewell and thank you to Alexis Levinson, who will join BuzzFeed as a political reporter shortly after the election focusing on the madness sure to unfold in the House. 

For the past year and a half, Alexis had ably covered both the presidential election and down-ballot races. Her latest piece, on the unexpectedly competitive House race in Indiana’s ninth district, which Mitt Romney carried by 17 points, is a great example. 

Thanks to Alexis for all the great work she’s done, and be sure to continue to follow her reporting at BuzzFeed after November. 

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