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America’s Sunny Future: Possible, Not Certain

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Walter Russell Mead has done a remarkable series of long posts on the future of American political economy. The fourth installment argues that we are undergoing a transformation that will ultimately create lots of good jobs, but that we’ll have to get used to seeing service jobs very differently. 

There is significant overlap between this very optimistic piece and my “Keeping America’s Edge” essay from a couple of years ago. But I tried to emphasize that while such a sunny future is possible, achieving it is likely to require serious social, political, and economic reform. America has led economic transformations before; we are not pre-ordained to lead the next one.

Jim Manzi is CEO of Applied Predictive Technologies (APT), an applied artificial intelligence software company.

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