The Corner

Anonymous, Baseless, Bizarre

The Daily Caller has a piece up bizarrely alleging that our editorial on The Pledge was crafted (“prearranged”) by the House Republican leadership, through the good offices of April Ponnuru and Kate O’Beirne of the National Review Institute. The author of the piece, Jon Ward, didn’t bother to contact anyone at NR to check this allegation, although he did send an email to April less than an hour before the piece ran without any notice about his deadline. Again, April works for the National Review Institute, not the magazine, and was unable to return his email in time (she has been on maternity leave for the past two months). It’s pretty basic practice to call to check things out or get a response from targets of your piece, so I’m surprised that our friends at The Daily Caller didn’t call anyone at the magazine before hitting publish (it’s not like NR isn’t in the phone book!) As for the charge itself, it’s categorically false. The editorial represented our best, independent judgment on the “Pledge” as a solid, but hardly perfect, document. You can disagree with it (and some fellow conservatives have), but it’s also been endorsed by hugely influential conservative leaders. As always, we’ve had a variety of voices on NRO on the Pledge and its merits. We welcome debate on our editorial, on the Pledge, and on pretty much anything. That debate isn’t furthered, though, by anonymous sources making baseless allegations that no one bothers to check. We wish The Daily Caller every success, but ask one favor: Please, next time, at least give us a call.

(The piece has been updated now with a denial from Kate and changes a mis-identification of Yuval Levin–all without telling readers what’s been changed or why.)

Most Popular

U.S.

A Data Double Take: Police Shootings

In a recent article, social scientist Patrick Ball revisited his and Kristian Lum’s 2015 study, which made a compelling argument for the underreporting of lethal police shootings by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Lum and Ball’s study may be old, but it bears revisiting amid debates over the American ... Read More
U.S.

A Data Double Take: Police Shootings

In a recent article, social scientist Patrick Ball revisited his and Kristian Lum’s 2015 study, which made a compelling argument for the underreporting of lethal police shootings by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Lum and Ball’s study may be old, but it bears revisiting amid debates over the American ... Read More

How Many Jeffrey Epsteins Are There?

Goodman Brown was a young, pious man, from a family of “honest men and good Christians since the days of the martyrs,” when he first discovered that the society around him was full of evil hiding in plain sight. Brown, the main character of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1835 short story “Young Goodman Brown,” ... Read More

How Many Jeffrey Epsteins Are There?

Goodman Brown was a young, pious man, from a family of “honest men and good Christians since the days of the martyrs,” when he first discovered that the society around him was full of evil hiding in plain sight. Brown, the main character of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1835 short story “Young Goodman Brown,” ... Read More
Culture

How Long Will Margaret Sanger Last?

Much of the radical Left is at present consumed by a feverish desire to erase from U.S. history anyone whom they’ve deemed in some way insufficiently loyal to the progressive creed of 2020. The statue-toppling brigades have exercised little discretion in determining which of our leaders are no longer fit for ... Read More
Culture

How Long Will Margaret Sanger Last?

Much of the radical Left is at present consumed by a feverish desire to erase from U.S. history anyone whom they’ve deemed in some way insufficiently loyal to the progressive creed of 2020. The statue-toppling brigades have exercised little discretion in determining which of our leaders are no longer fit for ... Read More
U.S.

The Audacity of a New Kind of Hope

‘Who are we?” “What are we here for?” These are some of the most fundamental questions of our lives. And they can lead to a bit of a crisis these days, as there is so much uncertainty. Those questions are about more than each one of us as an individual. As statues are being torn down, the question of who ... Read More
U.S.

The Audacity of a New Kind of Hope

‘Who are we?” “What are we here for?” These are some of the most fundamental questions of our lives. And they can lead to a bit of a crisis these days, as there is so much uncertainty. Those questions are about more than each one of us as an individual. As statues are being torn down, the question of who ... Read More