The Corner

Politics & Policy

Barack Obama Is Lying about America’s Gun Laws Again

Barack Obama is still lying about America’s gun laws. Per the Daily Mail:

Former president Barack Obama has claimed US gun laws ‘don’t make sense’.

The Democrat – who pushed for tighter restrictions during his two terms in office – said it was too easy ‘to buy machine guns.’

Speaking about the Sandy Hook school shooting that saw 20 children and six adults massacred, he described it as the ‘hardest day of his life’.

‘The worst thing for me was that I could not bring their children back or promise that we would change the laws,’ he told the 10,000-strong crowd.

‘Gun laws in the United States don’t make much sense. Anybody can buy any weapon, anytime without, you know, without much if any regulation. They can buy over the Internet. They can buy machine guns.’

This just isn’t true. It is possible for individuals to buy machine guns in some states, but, because the legal inventory contains only weapons that were made before 1986, they cost upwards of $10,000. Moreover, buying or transferring a machine gun in the United States requires an enormous amount of federal paperwork, an in-depth federal background check, and the adding of the transferee’s name to a national registry. At present, this process takes around 16 months to complete.

Without much if any regulation? Give me a break.

Obama’s claim that one can buy a gun over the Internet is also extremely misleading. One can, indeed, buy a gun over the Internet, but that gun is not shipped to one’s home in the way an Amazon package would be, but to a federally licensed firearms dealer who requires the end-buyer to fill in all the usual paperwork, to submit to a federal background check, and to complete the transaction in-person in exactly the same way as he would have had he walked in off the street. This has been the case since Obama was seven years old.

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